Planning for Crime Prevention: A Transatlantic Perspective

By Richard H. Schneider; Ted Kitchen | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Richard M. Titus, Ph.D.

National Institute of Justice *

The role of place in crime causation and control has in recent years received increasing attention from criminologists: routine activity theory and opportunity theory being two examples. The same can be said for criminal justice practitioners; examples being crime analysis, crime mapping, problem-oriented policing, community policing, Weed and Seed, and COMPASS. The situation with planners and architects is different: as the authors of this text point out, those who create the environments in which we live, work, play, and travel too often seem to be minimally conscious of how their work can affect the safety of those who use these environments. And while avoidance of victimisation may not be uppermost in the minds of those who locate and operate businesses, decide where to live, plan an evening's entertainment, etc., it is a factor in all these decisions.

The authors are not arguing an environmental determinism. While thoughtless planning and architecture can create environments that criminals find to be more congenial, it does not follow that security-conscious design can eliminate the risk to people and their property: the authors point out the need for involvement of the users and managers of these environments, along with public and private security.

The authors are careful to place their recommendations in the context of the available research and evaluation. They point out that this literature is rather scanty. Nonetheless, the burden of the evidence they review is that changes in the environment can lead to reductions in various types of crime. This evidence is difficult to assess: much of it was accumulated during a period when crime rates - at least in the USA - were trending downward. It is tempting to assume that the many environmental crime prevention strategies put in place over the period ** may have contributed to this decline, but if not, it remains to be seen how they will perform if crime rates rise again.

* For identification only. The opinions expressed are those of the author and do not represent policy of the National Institute of Justice or the US Department of Justice

** e.g. the placement of security guards or concierges in the lobbies of almost all downtown office buildings.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Planning for Crime Prevention: A Transatlantic Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 331

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.