Human Nature after Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction

By Janet Radcliffe Richards | Go to book overview

Index

a
action, rational see rationality
Adam's navel40-2
affirming the consequent, fallacy of 109-10 , 114
age and sexual attractiveness 78
algorithms, Darwinian 208
altruism 154-83
passim:
and classical Darwinism 158-9 ;
and neo-Darwinism 159-66 ;
and psychological egoism 175-7 ;
and social insects 64 , 159 , 162-3 ;
as a surface phenomenon 266 ;
Barash on 167-74 ;
biologists' meaning of 158-9 ;
defined out of existence 176-7 ;
genuine and spurious 166-77 ;
kin-directed 162-3 , 170-4 ;
meaning of 155 ;
parental 170-4 ;
reciprocal 163-5 , 167-70
analytic techniques see texts, techniques for analysis of
antecedent:
and consequent of conditionals 92-3 ;
fallacy of denying the 109
anti-Darwinism 51-2 , 55 ;
see also creationism
applied values see values
Argument from Design 1 , 17-18 ;
Darwinism as a threat to 21
arguments:
in analysis of texts 168-72 , 229-34 ;
incomplete 94 ;
testing conditionals by setting out as 93-6
Aristotle 5-7 , 16
astrology 8
Axelrod, Robert 164

b
Barash, David 167-72
begging the question 33 , 140
Behe, Michael 89
Berkeley, George 11 , 33
biology as destiny 100-25
blame 126-40 ;
and punishment 148-52 ;
grounds for exempting from 128-9
blank-paper view of human nature 56 , 62-4
bottom-up explanation see cranes and skyhooks
boundaries between Darwinian views 55
burden of proof 219

c
Catholicism:
and Darwinism 52 ;
and Pascal's Wager 34-5
certainty see scepticism
Christianity:
and Aristotelian cosmology 6 , 16 ;
and Darwinism 52
cogitative Being (Locke) 10 , 57
cogito ergo sum32
compatibilism 136 , 149
compatible and competing explanations 19 , 177-81
conditionals:
deciding which to investigate 97 ;
how to assess 91-7 ;
truth conditions of 92-3 ;
value of investigating 87-90
conflict of interest:
between parents and children 69 ;
between the sexes 69 , 74-80 , 227 , 245-6
conscience 185 , 205 , 209
consequent and antecedent see antecedent
contingent truth 94-5 , 144
contraries and contradictories 142-4 , 147
Copernicus 4 , 7 , 27
Cosmides, Leda 207
counterexamples 29 , 172 ;
in moral reasoning 198
cranes and skyhooks (Dennett) 18 , 20-3 , 53 , 55 , 260 , 263
creationism 1 , 25 , 28 ;
and Gosse's arguments 45 ;
'scientific' 45 ;
see also intelligent design theory
criticisms of people (as opposed to theories) 83-5 , 216

d
Daly, Martin 79
Dante 6
Darwin, Charles:
and the limits of the original theory 17 , 21 ;
on evolution by natural selection 11-15 ;
on God and suffering 191
Darwin, Erasmus 11 , 249
Darwin wars 52 ;
battle lines in 54-6
Darwinian algorithms 210
Darwinian explanation
as a universal acid
(Dennett) 21-2 ;
diagram 54 ;
nature of 15-18 , 20-3 ;
of the origins of life (Dawkins) 58-61 ;
of the origins of the universe 23 , 53 ;
scope of 15 , 52-6
Darwinism:
and medicine 54 ;
and radical
scepticism 32-50 ;
and religion 52 , 188-92 , 260-4 ;

-309-

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Human Nature after Darwin: A Philosophical Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Theory 4
  • 2 - The Sceptics 25
  • 3 - Internecine Strife 51
  • 4 - Implications and Conditionals 87
  • 5 - Biology as Destiny 100
  • 6 - Blameless Puppets 126
  • 7 - Selfish Genes and Moral Animals 154
  • 8 - The End of Ethics 184
  • 9 - Onwards and Upwards 212
  • 10 - The Real Differences 259
  • Notes 271
  • Answers to Exercises 273
  • Revision Questions 288
  • Answers to Revision Questions 299
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 304
  • Bibliography 307
  • Index 309
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