Me against My Brother: At War in Somalia, Sudan, and Rwanda: A Journalist Reports from the Battlefields of Africa

By Scott Peterson | Go to book overview

TEN

DIVIDED BY GOD

Our religion says that it is wrong to mistreat cats. How could we torture humans?

-Abdelaziz Shiddo, minister of justice, defending Sudan's human rights record

The biting sharp stink of sweaty saddle leather was more acrid in the heat, and blended well with the charged air of Islamic fervor. Battalions of chanting Arab warriors sat astride horses and camels, cracking hide whips, menacing with long swords and their 1,000 spears glinting in hard sunlight. They wore full battle regalia, white turbans and flowing robes, on the southern edge of the Sahara desert. In Sudan in March 1992, this town of Ed Daien, nearly 1,000 miles southwest of the capital, Khartoum, is as close to the front line as you could get without taking up a sword or Kalashnikov yourself. For this is a civil war between north and south, a war that is both ethnic and religious, one fought between Arabs and Africans, Muslims and Christians. It is one in which violence has steadily increased as if to comply with ancient prophecies of apocalypse.

The rally was a medieval show of strength by those bent on imposing Allah's will-Islam-from the north across all of Sudan; and then much further, deeper, into Africa. The horsemen had gathered en masse to greet Sudan's President Lt. Gen. Omar Hassan el-Bashir. When his small plane touched down on the airstrip, the rhythmic clanking and shouting noise of battle doubled. Urging these citizens on with his stick, the general made his way past the lineup for 20 minutes. Presidential pride grew with this show of support, renewing hopes of triumph in the Holy War against infidels in the south.

The stocky president mounted a platform, his green military

-173-

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Me against My Brother: At War in Somalia, Sudan, and Rwanda: A Journalist Reports from the Battlefields of Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Somalia 1a
  • Sudan 1g
  • Rwanda 1k
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Maps xxiii
  • Part I - Somalia 1
  • One - Laws of War 3
  • Two - "City of the Insane" 19
  • Three - A Land Forgotten by God 37
  • Four - “club Skinny-Dancers Wanted” 51
  • Five - “camp of the Murderers” 71
  • Six - The Fugitive 93
  • Seven - Bloody Monday 117
  • Eight - Mission Impossible 137
  • Nine - Back to Zero 157
  • Part II - Sudan 171
  • Ten - Divided by God 173
  • Eleven - War of the Cross 197
  • Twelve - The False Messiah 217
  • Thirteen - Darwin Deceived 229
  • Part III - Rwanda 245
  • Fourteen - A Holocaust 247
  • Fifteen - “dreadful Note of Preparation” 267
  • Sixteen - Genocide Denied 289
  • Seventeen - In Perpetuum 303
  • Epilogue 323
  • Notes 329
  • Index 351
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