Me against My Brother: At War in Somalia, Sudan, and Rwanda: A Journalist Reports from the Battlefields of Africa

By Scott Peterson | Go to book overview

SIXTEEN

GENOCIDE DENIED

The flow of blood is an arresting spectacle. The color alone demands attention and calls to mind violent acts of piercing or cutting and the shocking sameness of all living creatures beneath the skin.

-Barbara Ehrenreich, Blood Rites

Rhetoric comes easily about ensuring that genocide never strikes again. Full-blown genocide doesn't happen very often, and what could be more noble-as a politician and as a human being-than to stand against the systematic decimation of entire strains of our species?

For more than half a century, as it should have been and still is, marking the evils of the World War II holocaust against the Jews has been sound politics. That attempted genocide still stirs deep emotion. As much as we might prefer to forget the haunting details of systematic slaughter-the images of long pit graves stacked with stick-starved Jewish corpses, of gas chambers and rooms stuffed with hundreds of thousands of shoes and shorn hair-how can we expunge them?

Inaugurating the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., in April 1993, President Clinton spoke with full oratorical force about the need to “contemplate its meaning for us, ” and to “bind one of the darkest lessons in history to the hopeful soul of America.” Then he laid down the standard. The evil was “incontestable, ” he declared. “But as we are its witness, so we must remain its adversary in the world in which we live.” The president reserved special praise for “those known and those never to be known, who manned the thin line of righteousness, who risked their lives to save others, accruing no advantage to themselves.” 1

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Me against My Brother: At War in Somalia, Sudan, and Rwanda: A Journalist Reports from the Battlefields of Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Somalia 1a
  • Sudan 1g
  • Rwanda 1k
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Maps xxiii
  • Part I - Somalia 1
  • One - Laws of War 3
  • Two - "City of the Insane" 19
  • Three - A Land Forgotten by God 37
  • Four - “club Skinny-Dancers Wanted” 51
  • Five - “camp of the Murderers” 71
  • Six - The Fugitive 93
  • Seven - Bloody Monday 117
  • Eight - Mission Impossible 137
  • Nine - Back to Zero 157
  • Part II - Sudan 171
  • Ten - Divided by God 173
  • Eleven - War of the Cross 197
  • Twelve - The False Messiah 217
  • Thirteen - Darwin Deceived 229
  • Part III - Rwanda 245
  • Fourteen - A Holocaust 247
  • Fifteen - “dreadful Note of Preparation” 267
  • Sixteen - Genocide Denied 289
  • Seventeen - In Perpetuum 303
  • Epilogue 323
  • Notes 329
  • Index 351
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