watertight) compartments of my mind, even though I believed that I had solved the problem of induction by the simple discovery that induction by repetition did not exist (any more than did learning something new by repetition): the alleged inductive method of science had to be replaced by the method of (dogmatic) trial and (critical) error elimination, which was the mode of discovery of all organisms from the amoeba to Einstein.

Of course I was aware that my solutions to both these problems-the problem of demarcation, the problem of induction-made use of the same idea: that of the separation of dogmatic and critical thinking. Nevertheless the two problems seemed to me quite different; demarcation had no similarity with Darwinian selection. Only after some years did I realize that there was a close link, and that the problem of induction arose essentially from a mistaken solution of the problem of demarcation-from the mistaken (positivist) belief that what elevated science over pseudoscience was the “scientific method” of finding true, secure, and justifiable knowledge, and that this method was the method of induction: a belief that erred in more ways than one.


11.

MUSIC

In all this, speculations about music played a considerable part, especially during my apprenticeship.

Music has been a dominant theme in my life. My mother was very musical: she played the piano beautifully. It seems that music is a thing that runs in families, though why this should be so is very puzzling indeed. European music seems much too recent an invention to be genetically based, and primitive music is a thing which many very musical people dislike as much as

-56-

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