was such that without the moral support of my friends in New Zealand I could hardly have survived. Under these circumstances the reaction of those friends in the United States to whom I sent the manuscript was a terrible blow. They did not react at all for many months; and later, instead of submitting the manuscript to a publisher, they solicited an opinion from a famous authority, who decided that the book, because of its irreverence towards Aristotle (not Plato), was not fit to be submitted to a publisher.

After almost a year, when I was at my wit's end and in terribly low spirits, I obtained, by chance, the English address of my friend Ernst Gombrich, with whom I had lost contact during the war. Together with Hayek, who most generously offered his help (I had not dared to trouble him since I had seen him only a few times in my life), he found a publisher. Both wrote most encouragingly about the book. The relief was immense. I felt that these two had saved my life, and I still feel so.


25.

OTHER WORK IN NEW ZEALAND

This was not the only work I did in New Zealand. I also did some work in logic-in fact, I invented for myself something now called “natural deduction” 188 -and I did much work, and much lecturing, on the logic of scientific discovery, including work in the history of science. This latter work consisted in the main in applications of my logical ideas on discovery to actual discoveries; but I also tried to make clear to myself the immense historical importance of erroneous theories, such as the Parmenidean theory of the full world.

In New Zealand I gave courses of lectures on noninductivist methods of science to the Christchurch branch of the Royal Society of New Zealand and the Medical School in Dunedin. These were initiated by Professor (later Sir John) Eccles. During

-137-

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