relations between problems and theories-especially those theories which precede the problems; those problems which arise from theories, or with them; and those theories which are tentative solutions of certain problems.


30.

DEBATES WITH SCHRÖDINGER

It was in 1947 or 1948 that Schrödinger let me know that he was coming to London, and I met him in the mews house of one of his friends. From then on we were in fairly regular contact by way of letters, and by personal meetings in London, and later in Dublin, in Alpbach, Tyrol, and in Vienna.

In 1960 I was in hospital in Vienna, and as he was too ill to come to the hospital, his wife, Annemarie Schrödinger, came to see me every day. Before I returned to England I visited them in their apartment in the Pasteurgasse. It was the last time I saw him.

Our relations had been somewhat stormy. Nobody who knew him will be surprised at this. We disagreed violently on many things. Originally I had taken it almost for granted that he, with his admiration for Boltzmann, would not hold a positivist epistemology, but our most violent clash was sparked off when I criticized one day (in 1954 or 1955 approximately) the Machian view now usually called “neutral monism”-even though we both agreed that, contrary to Mach's intentions, this doctrine was a form of idealism. 212

Schrödinger had absorbed his idealism from Schopenhauer. But I had expected him to see the weakness of this philosophy, a philosophy about which Boltzmann had said harsh things, and against which for example Churchill, who never claimed to be a philosopher, had produced excellent arguments. 213 I was even more surprised when Schrödinger expressed such sensualist and

-156-

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