New Public Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects

By Kate McLaughlin; Stephen P. Osborne et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 9

New Public Management and social justice

Just efficiency or equity as well?

Jenny Harrow

Introduction

Exploration of NPM to discern its stance on social justice offers contrasting perspectives. Social justice may be thought largely absent from NPM thinking. If and where its signs appear, these are rare occurrences, like a comet's passing, intriguing but transitory. Alternatively, social justice may be felt capable of delivery only where public provision is demonstrably efficient and users' voices heard. Thus, social justice is a star in the NPM firmament, set to shine more brightly as NPM tenets take increased hold. This chapter explores the extent to which social justice and equity concerns and outcomes are present or absent in NPM thinking and practice. It is underpinned by the assumption that the social justice record of NPM deserves scrutiny.

The chapter commences with a consideration of what is understood here by NPM, and how notions of social justice and equity may be defined. It continues by consideration of the cases which may be made for the polar opposite perceptions of NPM in relation to the promotion and achievement of social justice. First, that NPM's efficiency preoccupation and combined characteristics preclude an equity focus; leaving wider social justice concerns beyond its remit. Second, that NPM's characteristics include and may even secure improved equity in public provision, making it a key factor in reaching social justice goals. For both these cases, examples are drawn predominantly from health, and to a lesser extent from prison and local government (especially urban) services, and these mainly in UK contexts. The chapter goes on to reflect on the balance of the arguments made, and declares as 'non-proven' the charge that NPM has been eliminating social justice objectives in public policy. It suggests that equity 'guardians' in NPM contexts are more likely to found in shifting coalitions, as public services simultaneously or variously fragment and are 'joined up', rather than in a single coherent group, such as elected representatives or public service professionals. It examines some theoretical and service contextual implications for juxtaposing equity and efficiency as NPM goals. Finally, it highlights a need for increased knowledge concerning new public managers' working values, and the place of social justice and equity concerns within those values.

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Public Management: Current Trends and Future Prospects
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 355

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.