After Wilson: The Struggle for the Democratic Party, 1920-1934

By Douglas B. Craig | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Like most books, this one has had a long gestation and many midwives. Professors David A. Shannon and William H. Harbaugh of the University of Virginia, as doctoral supervisors, provided essential guidance and criticism during this work's earlier life. Professor Harbaugh later provided unfailing encouragement during the long transition from dissertation to book. I am profoundly grateful to both men. Professors Robert D. Cross, Michael F. Holt, Joseph F. Kett, James Sterling Young, and Oliver Zunz also provided analysis and advice, for which I thank them. I also acknowledge a great debt to Professor Elliot A. Rosen, whose help on the conceptualization of this project came at a crucial time in its development.

Grants from the Corcoran Department of History and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the Unicversity of Virginia were generous and sustained, allowing me to undertake most of the archival research for this book. I have also been generously assisted by the Australian American Educational Foundation, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Foundation, the Hagley Museum and Library, the University of Sydney Travelling Scholarship Fund, and the Gowrie Trust Fund.

The librarians and archivists at the University of Virginia, Yale University, the University of Kentucky, Wright State University, Connecticut College, the Australian National University, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hagley Museum and Library, the Library, of Congress, the New York State Library, the New York Public Library, and the National Library of Australia all provided patient and expert advice, for which I am very grateful. I am also grateful to the copyright and physical-property owners by whose permission quotations from manuscripts appear in this book.

The staff at the University of North Carolina Press have been pillars of strength and patience through a protracted revision and production process. Lewis Bateman, Sandra Eisdorfer, and Craig Noll, especially, have played major roles in bringing this work into existence. My sincere gratitude goes to them and to all the staff at Chapel Hill.

Along the way I have accumulated innumerable personal debts. The Crystals of Richmond, Mrs. Olive Jones of Lexington, Kentucky, the Newells of Bethel, Connecticut, Mrs. Esther Bradley of Hyde Park, New

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
After Wilson: The Struggle for the Democratic Party, 1920-1934
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.