Children in the City: Home, Neighborhood, and Community

By Pia Christensen; Margaret O'Brien | Go to book overview

Notes
1
The UK study was carried out together with Allison James and Chris Jenks. This study involved 10-year-old children living in two villages and a provincial city in the north of England. The Changing Times project was funded by the ESRC as part of the research programme Children 5-16: Growing into the 21st Century. The Danish data derive from a study Børn og Tid on children's time that I carried out with children and young people living in a local district of Copenhagen. This study was funded by the Danish Research Council's research programmeChildren's Living Conditions and Welfare. I wish to thank both funding bodies for providing financial support for carrying out the research. I am grateful to all the children and young people who participated in the studies.
2
The notion of emplacement refers to the process through which consciousness, the body, sensuous presence and place are simultaneously produced and knitted together. Examples of its deployment are found in Casey (1996) and Feld (1996).
3
In north England I was carrying out field studies centred on children in two villages in the eastern part of Yorkshire. However, my knowledge of the local area derives from four years intense field research in four village communities. The data I present in this chapter are from children living in the small village, Woldsby. I use a pseudonym to protect the identity of individuals.
4
My particular knowledge of children and families living in this particular local area of Copenhagen derives from three ethnographic studies centred on different aspects of children's everyday lives that I have been carrying out since 1990. The data presented in this chapter derive from a recent field study carried out in 2000, investigating 10-11-year-old and 14-16-year-old children's use and understanding of time.
5
In the rural area children depended on their parents (in particular mothers) to provide transport to attend after-school activities in the local market town or when visiting their friends living in the countryside. This meant that they, similarly to the children in Vanløse, also had little say over and opportunity to have an independent social life.

References
Augé, M., 1995, Non-places: Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity (London: Verso).
Casey, E., 1996, 'How to get from space to place in a fairly short stretch of time: phenomenological prolegomena'. In S. Feld and K. Basso (eds), Senses of Place. (Santa Fe: SAR Press).
Christensen, P. and James, A., 2001, 'What are schools for? The temporal experience of schooling'. In L. Alanen and B. Mayall (eds), Conceptualising Child-Adult Relations (London: Falmer Press).
Christensen, P., James, A. and Jenks, C., 2000, 'Home and movement: children constructing "family time"'. In S.L. Holloway and G. Valentine (eds), Children's Geographies: Playing, Living, Learning (London: Routledge).
Dillard, A., 1987, An American Childhood (New York: Harper Perenial).
Feld, S., 1996, 'Waterfalls of song: an acoustemology of place resounding in Bosavi, Papua New Guinea'. In S. Feld and K. Basso (eds), Senses of Place (Santa Fe: SAR Press).
Feld, S. and Basso, K. (eds), 1996, Senses of Place (Santa Fe: SAR Press).
Geertz, G., 1996, 'Afterword'. In S. Feld and K. Basso (eds), Senses of Place (Santa Fe: SAR Press).

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Children in the City: Home, Neighborhood, and Community
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Children in the City 1
  • References 11
  • 2 - Place, Space and Knowledge 13
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - Children's Views of Family, Home and House 29
  • 4 - 'Displaced' Children? 46
  • 5 - Shaping Daily Life in Urban Environments 66
  • 6 - Children in the Neighbourhood 82
  • References 98
  • 7 - The Street as a Liminal Space 101
  • 8 - Neighbourhood Quality in Children's Eyes 118
  • 9 - Regenerating Children's Neighbourhoods 142
  • Notes 160
  • 10 - Improving the Neighbourhood for Children 162
  • Notes 180
  • 11 - Planning Childhood 184
  • Note 204
  • Index 206
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