Better Behaviour in Classrooms: A Framework for Inclusive Behaviour Management

By Kay Mathieson; Meg Price | Go to book overview

6

Managing the emotional environment in the classroom

Having identified the predictable presenting behaviours for the establishment phase of the academic year we can begin to make conscious decisions about how to manage them. It is important to remember that the same responses are evident in adults as well as the pupils. Equally there may be others not listed which are significant for us personally, for example some of us generally find beginnings exciting and stimulating, but endings difficult and stressful. By identifying our personal feelings about the different stages of the year we can also begin to manage our own behaviour and be aware of the effect it will have on our perception of events.

To develop effective behaviour management strategies for ourselves we need to be able to accurately identify our emotions at any given point in time. To enhance this process it is useful to reflect on the very first sign that we are feeling anxious, angry, frightened etc. By doing this we are able to buy some time to employ management strategies appropriate to the specific context. This may be taking a deep breath and walking away or verbally signalling our feelings to those involved before the situation escalates. Once the emotion is effective beyond our first indicators we are less able to control our responses. Logically then, highly charged emotional situations are not a time to begin employing behaviour management strategies.

Having acknowledged our own emotional responses and predicted the presenting behaviours of our pupils for the first stage of the academic year, we are able to take this as a baseline for constructing a behaviour plan for the establishment phase.


The classroom community

Our class is in effect a community, a transient but a functioning community all the same. Each member of the community will establish a place in the community and have a role to play. We must also clarify, individually, what we see as the role of teacher and learners in our own context. For effective use of appropriate behaviour management strategies there must be congruency of philosophy between what we are trying to achieve and the way in which we try to achieve it. There would be no point in employing strategies, which give opportunity for experimental behavioural learning on behalf of pupils if we require high levels of situational control as teachers. Although it would be an

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Better Behaviour in Classrooms: A Framework for Inclusive Behaviour Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Communicating with the Emotional Brain 3
  • 2 - From Policy to Practice 7
  • 3 - The Big Picture 15
  • 4 - Consensus-Driven Behaviour Planning Within the Classroom 20
  • 5 - Behaviour - Taught Not Caught, Making the Message Clear 24
  • 6 - Managing the Emotional Environment in the Classroom 28
  • 7 - Managing the Physical Environment in the Classroom 33
  • 8 - The Reflective Practitioner 36
  • 9 - Consolidation Phase 41
  • 10 - Transitions 49
  • 11 - Planning Spirit Lifters 52
  • Conclusion 55
  • Inset Sessions 58
  • In-Set 1 61
  • Theme: Authority 68
  • Theme: Behaviour Issues 85
  • Suggested Further Reading 95
  • Index 96
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