Better Behaviour in Classrooms: A Framework for Inclusive Behaviour Management

By Kay Mathieson; Meg Price | Go to book overview

9

Consolidation phase

Considering behaviour from the pupil's perspective

The consolidation phase begins around the end of the first and beginning of the second term. By this stage, the class community has established a system of relationships and hierarchy. The majority of pupils will behave appropriately on the majority of occasions. Equally, those who have difficulty with behavioural learning or are otherwise motivated will have clearly identified themselves. We need to be careful to acknowledge the needs of both groups at this stage. We will be particularly aware of the latter group because of their contribution to our frustration and stress levels.

The original behaviour action plan can now be revised, acknowledging the progress made. In the same way that we revise curriculum plans, there is a need to reflect on whether progress is as we expected and if not why not. This does not mean looking for a hook on which to hang the blame, but to build on strengths and access appropriate advice and strategies to make further progress.

As part of our reflection during the consolidation phase, we should also consider and review the impact of school systems, teaching styles and organisation. Often the routines and structures in school have a supportive effect on pupil behaviour. Sometimes it does not. Looking for time and context patterns of inappropriate behaviour can point to a system which encourages deterioration of behaviour. For example, in some schools pupils who behave inappropriately during break times stand in line in a corridor. Pupils may identify this as the best place to be on a wet day, inside with all your mates. Looking at systems from the pupil's perspective can be very illuminating and shadowing particular pupils can highlight obvious difficulties. One situation worth exploring is to compare the variety of behaviours exhibited by specific pupils with different teachers. Also the changes in behaviour during practical subjects, hall times, in large classrooms, small classrooms, in large groups, small groups, etc. We are all susceptible to different feelings engendered by the amount of space available to us.

It is equally important to give feedback to the group of pupils who have achieved or exceeded the targets set. A review of the establishment phase discussions and displays about behaviour will focus attention on appropriate behaviours which have become an accepted part of classroom life. It will also give an opportunity to reflect on how difficult or easy it has been to achieve these targets.

There is an expectation that pupils have considerable knowledge about how a classroom works. They are aware of nuances of behavioural limits and can interpret a variety of responses. In every class, there is a group of pupils who are

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Better Behaviour in Classrooms: A Framework for Inclusive Behaviour Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Communicating with the Emotional Brain 3
  • 2 - From Policy to Practice 7
  • 3 - The Big Picture 15
  • 4 - Consensus-Driven Behaviour Planning Within the Classroom 20
  • 5 - Behaviour - Taught Not Caught, Making the Message Clear 24
  • 6 - Managing the Emotional Environment in the Classroom 28
  • 7 - Managing the Physical Environment in the Classroom 33
  • 8 - The Reflective Practitioner 36
  • 9 - Consolidation Phase 41
  • 10 - Transitions 49
  • 11 - Planning Spirit Lifters 52
  • Conclusion 55
  • Inset Sessions 58
  • In-Set 1 61
  • Theme: Authority 68
  • Theme: Behaviour Issues 85
  • Suggested Further Reading 95
  • Index 96
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