British Foreign Policy, 1874-1914: The Role of India

By Sneh Mahajan | Go to book overview

5

Facing the Franco-Russian combine, 1892-8

In August 1892, when Gladstone kissed the Queen's hands for the fourth time, the Franco-Russian Alliance was already in the offing. During the last week of July 1891, a French squadron had visited Kronstadt and was accorded an enthusiastic welcome there. A month later, in August, there was an exchange of letters between the two governments. If peace was threatened, the two powers agreed not merely to consult each other but also 'to agree on measures' to be taken. A year later, during the month when Gladstone formed the government, a military convention was signed between the generals of the two countries. Under this, Russia promised support to France even against Germany alone. In return, the French agreed to mobilise (though not necessarily to go to war) even if Austria-Hungary alone mobilised against Russia. 1 The convention was to last as long as the Triple Alliance, though neither France nor Russia knew the term of the latter. Tsar Alexander, basically because of his misgivings regarding allying with a republican state, gave his approval only in December 1893, to which the French reciprocated on 4 January 1894. 2 This joined Russia and France firmly through a military convention and formal alliance. The negotiations leading to this alliance, as in all such cases, were carried on secretly. In fact, the first public mention of the alliance was made only in mid-1895. But the Kronstadt visit of the French fleet had been a public affair, and from reports in the French press, Britain and Germany were quick to sense that friendly exchanges had taken place between the two countries. After the Alliance was signed, the European powers did not know its terms, but they all tried to decipher what it stood for. From 1894, all questions in diplomacy centred on the intentions of France and Russia.

In Britain, during the six-year period from 1892 to 1898, the Liberals were in power for the first three years and the Conservatives thereafter. The success of the Liberals had given rise to anxieties that a policy of imperial retreat might be in the offing. In the election campaign, the Liberals had made it clear that they stood for opposition to foreign ventures, the system of alliances and control over Egypt. The French saw themselves as beneficiaries of this programme, while Germany remained apprehensive about the intentions of the government. In practice, however, nothing changed. The Liberal Unionists went over to the Conservatives. The views of the Liberal Imperialists, who remained in the

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Foreign Policy, 1874-1914: The Role of India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • 1 - Constructing Britain's Foreign Policy 1
  • 2 - Flaunting the Indian Empire, 1874-80 33
  • 3 - In the Garb of Moral Imperatives, 1880-5 58
  • 4 - Courting the Triple Alliance, 1885-92 80
  • 5 - Facing the Franco-Russian Combine, 1892-8 101
  • 6 - Seeking Partnerships, 1898-1902 124
  • 7 - Russia: a Friend at Last, 1902-7 145
  • 8 - Nurturing the Entente, 1907-14 168
  • 9 - Conclusion 197
  • Appendix 205
  • Notes 207
  • Bibliography 240
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.