HOW TO USE THE READER

The Reader is intended for use as a teaching text, either on its own or as a secondary source-book, on a variety of courses. All the papers are selected from journals and collected volumes. No extracts from single authored monographs are included here. The papers are grouped into different parts, each having a brief introduction highlighting its theme. They are further divided into sections within the main parts, according to topics. Within each section, the papers are arranged, as far as possible, in a chronological order.

The general Introduction and Conclusion which I have written aim to provide links between the sections. The Introduction and Mackey's article together aim to place the other papers in this Reader in a wider context, and thus should be read first. Users can then choose to read the papers in different parts and sections which interest them most, although I have organised the papers in such a way that the focus of discussion moves from the macro-external (social and sociolinguistic) to the micro-internal (linguistic and psychological) aspects of bilingualism. The editorial material I have added, in the form of sectional introductions, points out the differences and similarities in the theoretical and methodological stances of individual papers. I have followed the models of successful readers such as Garcia and Baker (1995) and provided a set of Study Questions and Study Activities at the end of each section. The Study Questions are intended for reviewing some of the essential themes and concepts in the individual papers and can be used on beginners' level courses or for self study. The Study Activities aim to extend reading by generalisation to the user's own locality or experience. Some of the activities require research, and may be used as topics for essays or dissertation projects. These are particularly suitable for use at an intermediate level. There is also a short list of Further Reading which suggests additional sources of material for those who are interested in following up particular issues and ideas. The Conclusion chapter highlights some of the methodological issues in bilingualism research. Although it is placed at the end of the volume, it can (and perhaps should) be read before reading the individual papers.

I have also provided a Resource List and a Glossary. The Resource List

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