Chapter 14

Cerebral lateralization in bilinguals: methodological issues
LO RAINE K.OBLER, ROBERT J. ZATORRE, LINDA GALLOWAY AND JYOTSNA VAID THE QUESTION OF INTEREST regarding cerebral lateralization for language in bilinguals is whether it differs from that in monolinguals. If lateralization is the same in both groups, one could expect it to be so for both languages of the bilinguals; if not, there are a number of theoretical possibilities; namely:
1 language is more left lateralized in the bilingual than in the monolingual
(a) for one language or
(b) for both; or
2 language is less left lateralized for the bilingual than for the monolinguals
(a) for one language or
(b) for both languages.

As with the studies of cerebral lateralization for language among children, elderly individuals, women, and musicians, conflicting findings have been reported around the issues of lateralization for language(s) in bilinguals. While lateralization data from bilinguals have been construed to support most of the theoretical possibilities mentioned above, the crux of recent debate has been whether or not there is greater right-hemisphere participation in the processing of one or both languages in the bilingual than in the monolingual. In order to appropriately interpret apparently contradictory findings, it becomes necessary to discuss a number of variables of potential importance to studies of cerebral lateralization with bilinguals. These include methodological variables such as subject selection, language and stimulus selection, test procedures, and data analysis, as well as theoretical questions around interpreting dichotic and tachistoscopic measures of lateralization. Many of the issues which arise in the literature on bilinguals have

-381-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Bilingualism Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 541

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.