The Economy of the Philippines: Elites, Inequalities and Economic Restructuring

By Peter Krinks | Go to book overview

2

The emergence of the space economy

Introduction

Societies continually experience social and economic change in a myriad ways, some unnoticed at the time, but with hindsight observers often perceive transitions that mark out phases of relatively slower change. Unfortunately for the analyst of an extensive archipelago such as the Philippines, no single scheme of periods applies to all of its regions. The islands and ethnic groups of the Philippines varied in the timing of their exposure to trade links to other parts of Asia, their contact with Islam, conquest by the Spanish and trade with industrializing capitalist countries. The significance of those differences further varied with the cultures of different groups, with their migrations and with their biophysical environments. Amongst other things, this means that the boundaries of meaningful regions could vary over time. Consequently, short of an encyclopaedic approach, any account of Philippine development must be generalized, and brief references to major, local variations are open to question by specialists.

At the same time, local developments are usually conditioned by their broader context, especially, of course, after the establishment of a national state and more so as the global economy becomes more closely articulated. One could, therefore, suggest a crude set of periods that have economic meaning for the Philippines in general. These are:

A.

1:

a period of undetermined length before maritime trade with other parts of Asia;

2:

a similarly undetermined period of trade with China, Japan and many parts of Southeast Asia, continuing from around 2,000 years ago at least to the late sixteenth century AD;

B.

1:

the early period of Spanish colonization, from 1565 to about 1780;

2:

the late period of Spanish rule with the economy increasingly opened to world trade, from about 1780 to 1898;

3:

the period of American (and, briefly, Japanese) rule, 1898 to 1946, with significant changes in politics and the domestic economy;

-14-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Economy of the Philippines: Elites, Inequalities and Economic Restructuring
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Tables ix
  • Maps x
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - Understanding Uneven Development in the Philippines 1
  • 2 - The Emergence of the Space Economy 14
  • 3 - Dispar Ities in Development at the End of the Twentieth Century 54
  • 4 - The Impact of Restructuring in the Primary Sector 98
  • 5 - Restructuring in the Industrial Sector 143
  • 6 - Growth and Problems in the Services Sector 188
  • 7 - The Struggle Against Uneven Development 220
  • Appendix I - Presidents of the Philippines 230
  • Appendix II - Official Exchange Rate of Philippine Peso Against Us$1.00 231
  • Notes 232
  • Bibliography 240
  • Index 259
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 262

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.