Rhode Island Politics and Government

By Maureen Moakley; Elmer Cornwell | Go to book overview

Notes

1. RHODE ISLAND IN TRANSITION
1
The World Almanac and Book of Facts: 1999 (Manwah nj: Primedia, 1999).
2
A competing explanation holds that the state was named Rhode Island by the Dutch explorer Adriaen Block who termed it Roodt Eyland (red island) because of the red soil visible from the shore. Most people, including those at the Rhode Island Historical Society, hold to the other, more appealing, interpretation.
3
During the early twentieth century the state had the nation's largest foreign-born percentage of population. The 1930 census figures indicated that 30 percent of the population in Rhode Island was foreign born.
4
During the 1960s and 1970s the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University, New Jersey, began sponsoring a series of state legislative conferences on professionalizing state legislatures and published a series of reports on the various states. The one written on Rhode Island was generally ignored. See Charles Tantillo, Strengthening the Rhode Island Legislature (New Brunswick nj: Rutgers University Press, 1968).
5
See Kendra A. Holvey and Harold A. Holvey, State Fact Finder: Ranking across America: 1998 (Washington dc: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1998).
6
Rhode Island ranks 33d among fifty states in total crime reported, below Massachusetts and Connecticut. The state has for decades had one of the lowest homicide rates in the country; while it formerly ranked high on car thefts, that number declined significantly throughout the 1990s. Providence Journal, 16 May 1995.
7
Tom Rice and Alexander Sumberg, “Civic Culture and Government Performance in the American States, ” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 27 (winter 1997): 99–114.
8
Richard McIntyre “Field of Dreams and Labor Market Outcomes in the 1990s, ”

-225-

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Rhode Island Politics and Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Series Preface xi
  • Authors' Preface xiii
  • Rhode Island Politics and Government *
  • Chapter One - Rhode Island in Transition 1
  • Chapter Two - Political Culture in the Ocean State 19
  • Chapter Three - Rhode Island and the Federal System 36
  • Chapter Four - The Constitution 50
  • Chapter Five - The General Assembly 65
  • Chapter Six - The Executive and the Administration 84
  • Chapter Seven - The Courts 108
  • Chapter Eight - Political Parties 125
  • Chapter Nine - Interest and Group Representation 144
  • Chapter Ten - Budget Politics and Policy 163
  • Chapter Eleven - The Politics of Education 178
  • Chapter Twelve - Local Government 196
  • Epilogue 213
  • General Resources 219
  • Notes 225
  • Index 241
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