British Women and the Spanish Civil War

By Angela Jackson | Go to book overview

1

Introduction

The crowd roared. We stood at the top of a long steep ramp leading down into the stadium. Eager hands grasped the wheelchairs of some of the International Brigaders to guide their descent into the arena. We had entered through dim passages like footballers arriving for a cup final, but not one of the Brigaders could have been prepared for the warmth of the reception when they emerged into the light of the Sports Palace in Madrid, where a concert had been prepared in their honour. We were in Spain for the week of events commemorating the sixtieth anniversary of the Spanish Civil War. Already the occasion was touched with sadness for me because I had hoped to be there with the woman who had been the initial inspiration for this research, Frida Stewart. She had wanted to return because the Spanish war had been of crucial significance in her life, a catalyst for her political beliefs. She had died a month before, and I had been asked to scatter some of her ashes on Spanish soil.

For Patience Darton who had been a nurse in the Brigades during the war, this first return to Spain since 1938 represented even more than the reprise of an early formative experience. The man she loved, a German International Brigader, had been killed in the battle of the Ebro. She had only recently begun to speak of this, and on the night of the concert, hearing the songs she had learned so long ago and being cheered so fervently by the people of Madrid, she was glad she had gone back. The next day and night I was with Patience and her son in the city hospital, holding her hand as she slipped deeper into unconsciousness and finally death. I had gone to Spain to understand the significance of this historic return but also discovered that the weight of symbolism can rest heavily on the heart. The grief felt by those who had known her was not diminished by a recognition of the allegorical implications of her death, a shared awareness of subtext that was also reflected in the language of newspaper reports on her death, Morir en Madrid, 'To Die in Madrid', the title of one of the most famous documentaries made on the Spanish war and now a headline for her obituary. Sixty years before, the Brigaders had been prepared to die for a cause in which they believed and now the circle was closed by their return to accept the tribute offered in gratitude by the Spanish people, and by the presence of death once again. 1

This study attempts to understand why this Spanish war became such an important part of the life experiences of so many British women, not only for those

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Women and the Spanish Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Clarion Call 10
  • 3 - Committee Culture 48
  • 4 - 'A Woman's Work in Wartime' 84
  • 5 - 'A Far Cry' 124
  • 6 - Aftermath 160
  • 7 - Conclusion 208
  • Appendices 215
  • Notes 251
  • Sources and Bibliography 296
  • Index 309
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 321

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.