Jehovah's Witnesses: Portrait of a Contemporary Religious Movement

By Andrew Holden | Go to book overview

5

Returning to Eden

In Chapter 2, I argued that the Witnesses' view of the cosmos and sense of spiritual mission puts them in tension with secular society. Their worldrenouncing beliefs mean that they are at once abandoned by modernity, yet they succeed by offering an affective bond to those who are rejected, isolated, disillusioned or unfulfilled. The Witnesses recruit by offering hope, self-confidence, support and direction to those who are prepared to listen to their message. In this chapter, I examine some of the cultural dynamics that play a part in sustaining membership and validating the Witnesses' Weltanschauung. This requires an understanding of the world as the Witnesses themselves see it and an examination of their future vision.


This too will pass away

The Mormons, the Seventh-Day Adventists and the Witnesses all belong to movements that espouse remarkably similar millenarian doctrines. All three communities are renowned for their unequivocal evangelistic messages concerning the end of time, and all see their mission as an essential part of the fulfilment of biblical prophecy. Although the belief in the Second Coming of Christ is steeped in the Judaeo-Christian tradition, orthodox Christianity has very little to say about how the event will occur, or when it is likely to happen. Consequently, those who belong to established churches and denominations are generally much less vociferous in their eschatological ministry than are world-renouncing sectarians. Indeed, one of the main sources of tension between Christian millenarians and modern secular society is the expectation of things to come. Like the Witnesses, Mormons believe that their proselytising efforts are essential for the inauguration of the Messianic Age. The gathering of the people of Israel from other nations, the return of the Jews from Jerusalem and the restoration of the lost tribes prophesied in Isaiah 2:2-3 will, according to the Mormons, be brought about by their current worldwide missionary activities, after which Christ will return in glory and exact vengeance on the wicked. Similarly, the Seventh-Day Adventists believe that Christ's Second Coming will consign the unbelieving to destruction on earth, while the righteous will be taken

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jehovah's Witnesses: Portrait of a Contemporary Religious Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • 1 - The End is Nigh 1
  • 2 - The Jehovah's Witnesses in the Modern World 17
  • 3 - Finding a Home 42
  • 4 - Rational Means to Rational Ends 58
  • 5 - Returning to Eden 82
  • 6 - Inside, Outside 103
  • 7 - Honour Thy Father and Thy Mother 125
  • 8 - The Fear of Freedom 150
  • 9 - Conclusion 171
  • Notes 176
  • Glossary 185
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 202
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 209

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.