Fifty Key Classical Authors

By Alison Sharrock; Rhiannon Ash | Go to book overview

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF CONTENTS
Aeschylus 35
Apollonius Rhodius 154
Apuleius 384
Archilochus 18
Aristophanes 84
Aristotle 128
Julius Caesar 214
Callimachus 145
Cassius Dio 401
Catullus 228
Cicero 203
Demosthenes 118
Ennius 171
Euripides 65
Herodotus 57
Hesiod 12
Homer 3
Horace 260
Juvenal 370
Livy 269
Longus 393
Lucan 322
Lucian 379

-viii-

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Fifty Key Classical Authors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents viii
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxi
  • In the Beginning 1
  • Homer 3
  • Notes 11
  • Further Reading 12
  • Athenian Hegemony 33
  • Aeschylus 35
  • Notes 42
  • Notes 49
  • Further Reading 50
  • Notes 56
  • Notes 64
  • Further Reading 65
  • Thucydides 74
  • Fourth Century 93
  • Lysias 95
  • Xenophon 103
  • Further Reading 118
  • Notes 127
  • Hellenistic 137
  • Menander 139
  • Notes 144
  • Further Reading 168
  • Early Roman 169
  • Ennius 171
  • Notes 184
  • Further Reading 185
  • Late Republican 201
  • Cicero 203
  • Notes 212
  • Notes 220
  • Catullus 228
  • Augustan 243
  • Virgil 245
  • Notes 268
  • Further Reading 276
  • Notes 290
  • Further Reading 291
  • Notes 295
  • Further Reading 296
  • Neronian and Flavian 297
  • Seneca the Younger 299
  • Notes 308
  • Petronius 310
  • Notes 321
  • Further Reading 322
  • Notes 328
  • Further Reading 329
  • Notes 333
  • Trajan and Hadrian 343
  • Plutarch 345
  • Further Reading 350
  • Further Reading 365
  • Further Reading 370
  • Notes 375
  • (Not) the End 377
  • Lucian 379
  • Notes 392
  • Timeline 407
  • Index 413
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