Fifty Key Classical Authors

By Alison Sharrock; Rhiannon Ash | Go to book overview

Notes
1
For a discussion of possible interpretations of the exile, see J.C. Thibault, The Mystery of Ovid's Exile, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1964.
2
H. Bloom, The Anxiety of Influence: A Theory of Poetry, New York: Oxford University Press, 2nd edn, 1997 (1st edn, 1973).
3
'Chiasmus' is a stylistic feature following the pattern ABBA.
4
See the excellent discussion of this opening poem and its sexual innuendo in D.F. Kennedy, The Arts of Love: Five Studies in the Discourse of Roman Love Elegy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, pp. 58-63.
5
This isn't the only way of reading the ending of the Metamorphoses. See P.R. Hardie, 'Questions of authority: The invention of tradition in Ovid Metamorphoses 15', in T. Habinek and A. Schiesaro (eds), The Roman Cultural Revolution, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 182-98, and A. Barchiesi, 'Endgames: Ovid's Metamorphoses 15 and Fasti 6', in D.H. Roberts, F.M. Dunn and D.P. Fowler (eds), Classical Closure: Reading the End in Greek and Latin Literature, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1997, pp. 181-208.
6
See S. Casali, 'quaerenti plura legendum: On the necessity of “reading more” in Ovid's exile poetry', Ramus, 26, 1997, pp. 80-112, and the other essays in that volume.
7
See L. Barkan, The Gods Made Flesh: Metamorphosis and the Pursuit of Paganism, New Haven, CT, and London: Yale University Press, 1986, on continuity in metamorphosis; G. Nugent, 'The sex which is not one: De-constructing Ovid's Hermaphrodite', Differences, 2.1, 1990, pp. 160-85, on Hermaphroditus.

See also in this book

Callimachus, Catullus, Lucan, Propertius, Statius, Sulpicia, Virgil


Texts, translations and commentaries

There are OCT editions of the amatory works and the exile poetry, but as yet not of the Metamorphoses or Fasti, nor the Heroides. There are up-to-date Teubners of Metamorphoses, Fasti and both exilic collections. The Loeb series is complete. The Metamorphoses exists in Penguin (prose) and World's Classics (verse), while a World's Classics edition of the Fasti was published in 2001, following the 2000 Penguin translation. The amatory poetry exists in both standard translations.

In Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics, there are editions of Metamorphoses 13, Fasti 4, a selection of single Heroides, and the double Heroides.

There is a major edition and commentary in four volumes on the Amores by J.C. McKeown (Leeds: Francis Cairns Publications), of which three volumes have appeared to date (1987, 1989, 1998). There is also an Aris and Phillips edition of Amores 2 by J. Booth.

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Fifty Key Classical Authors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents viii
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xxi
  • In the Beginning 1
  • Homer 3
  • Notes 11
  • Further Reading 12
  • Athenian Hegemony 33
  • Aeschylus 35
  • Notes 42
  • Notes 49
  • Further Reading 50
  • Notes 56
  • Notes 64
  • Further Reading 65
  • Thucydides 74
  • Fourth Century 93
  • Lysias 95
  • Xenophon 103
  • Further Reading 118
  • Notes 127
  • Hellenistic 137
  • Menander 139
  • Notes 144
  • Further Reading 168
  • Early Roman 169
  • Ennius 171
  • Notes 184
  • Further Reading 185
  • Late Republican 201
  • Cicero 203
  • Notes 212
  • Notes 220
  • Catullus 228
  • Augustan 243
  • Virgil 245
  • Notes 268
  • Further Reading 276
  • Notes 290
  • Further Reading 291
  • Notes 295
  • Further Reading 296
  • Neronian and Flavian 297
  • Seneca the Younger 299
  • Notes 308
  • Petronius 310
  • Notes 321
  • Further Reading 322
  • Notes 328
  • Further Reading 329
  • Notes 333
  • Trajan and Hadrian 343
  • Plutarch 345
  • Further Reading 350
  • Further Reading 365
  • Further Reading 370
  • Notes 375
  • (Not) the End 377
  • Lucian 379
  • Notes 392
  • Timeline 407
  • Index 413
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