The Cambridge Handbook of the Social Sciences in Australia

By Ian McAllister; Steve Dowrick et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Kym Anderson is professor of economics and associate dean (research) in the School of Economics, and foundation executive director of the Centre for International Economic Studies, at the University of Adelaide. He has been a research fellow of Europe's London-based Centre for Economic Policy Research since 1992, and a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia since 1994.

Patricia Apps is professor of public economics in the Faculty of Law, University of Sydney, adjunct professor, Faculty of Business, University of Technology, Sydney, and research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labour (IZA), Bonn, and the Economics Program, Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University. Her research focuses on taxation and welfare policy, and she specialises in modelling household decisions on labour supply, saving behaviour and fertility. She is a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.

Scott Baum is an Australian Research Council research fellow in the Centre for Research into Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures at the University of Queensland.Trained in sociology and economics, his research interests are in the socioeconomic aspects of urban and regional transformation, including distributional equity, housing and global city functions. He holds a PhD in sociology from Flinders University of South Australia.

Janeen Baxter is associate professor in sociology in the School of Social Science, University of Queensland. She has published extensively in the area of gender inequality in paid and unpaid work. She is involved in a longitudinal study of household organisation and labour-force involvement over the life course, and is writing a monograph on this project (with Edith Gray, Australian National University), examining the effect of marriage on various social outcomes for men and women.

Peter Beilharz is professor of sociology and director of the Thesis Eleven Centre for Critical Theory at La Trobe University. He co-founded the journal Thesis Eleven in 1980. He was professor of Australian studies at Harvard University, 1999–2000, and has been a visitor at Amsterdam, Tokyo, São Paolo, Mexico City, Canberra, Chapel Hill and Manila. He is author or editor of sixteen books, including Labour's Utopias, Transforming Labor, Postmodern Socialism, Imagining the Antipodes and Zygmunt Bauman – Dialectic of Modernity.

Stephen Bell is associate professor in the School of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Queensland. His research interests focus on business politics, political economy and the politics of economic policy. He has published widely in leading Australian and international journals and is the author or editor of six books.

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The Cambridge Handbook of the Social Sciences in Australia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Contributors x
  • Preface and Acknowledgements xviii
  • Introduction 1
  • References 13
  • Part 1 - Economics 15
  • Chapter 1 - Privatisation 17
  • References 27
  • Chapter 2 - Competition Policy and Regulation 31
  • References 40
  • Chapter 3 - Economics and the Environment 45
  • References 57
  • Chapter 4 - Health Economics 60
  • References 70
  • Chapter 5 - Immigration 74
  • References 87
  • Chapter 6 - Labour Market and Industrial Relations 94
  • References 113
  • Chapter 7 - Income Distribution and Redistribution 118
  • References 134
  • Chapter 8 - Taxation 138
  • References 148
  • Chapter 9 - Innovation 153
  • References 165
  • Chapter 10 - International Trade and Industry Policies 168
  • References 180
  • Chapter 11 - The Macro Economy 186
  • Notes 199
  • References 200
  • Chapter 12 - Money and Banking 203
  • References 216
  • Part 2 - Political Science 221
  • Chapter 13 - Political Theory 223
  • References 231
  • Chapter 14 - Federalism and the Constitution 234
  • References 246
  • Chapter 15 - Legislative Institutions 249
  • References 260
  • Chapter 16 - Political Parties and Electoral Behaviour 266
  • References 283
  • Chapter 17 - Electoral Systems 287
  • References 302
  • Chapter 18 - Gender Politics 305
  • References 319
  • Chapter 19 - Interest Groups and Social Movements 323
  • References 339
  • Chapter 20 - Environmental Policy and Politics 345
  • References 355
  • Chapter 21 - International Relations 358
  • Notes 368
  • References 369
  • Chapter 22 - Political Economy 374
  • References 391
  • Chapter 23 - Public Policy and Public Administration 406
  • References 422
  • Part 3 - Sociology 431
  • Chapter 24 - Patterns of Social Inequality 433
  • References 457
  • Chapter 25 - Families and Households 462
  • References 477
  • Chapter 26 - Gender Perspectives 480
  • References 493
  • Chapter 27 - Work and Employment 499
  • Notes 511
  • References 512
  • Chapter 28 - Crime and Deviance 518
  • References 531
  • Chapter 29 - Health and Illness 536
  • References 552
  • Chapter 30 - Population 554
  • References 569
  • Chapter 31 - Race, Ethnicity and Immigration 573
  • Notes 585
  • References 586
  • Chapter 32 - Urban and Regional Sociology 590
  • Reference 598
  • Chapter 33 - Rural Sociology 604
  • Reference 619
  • Chapter 34 - Religion and Spirituality 626
  • Reference 632
  • Chapter 35 - Cultural Studies, Australian Studies and Cultural Sociology 638
  • References 651
  • Chapter 36 - Sociological Theory 654
  • References 664
  • Chapter 37 - Social Policy and Social Welfare 666
  • References 674
  • Author Index 678
  • Subject Index 696
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