Environmental Problems of East Central Europe

By F. W. Carter; David Turnock | Go to book overview

6

Czech Republic

Petr Pavlínek

Introduction

Today's Czech Republic, the western part of former Czechoslovakia, is considered to be one of the most environmentally devastated countries in the whole of Europe (Figure 6.1). In particular, environmental degradation is concentrated in the industrial and urban regions such as northern Bohemia, northern Moravia and Prague (Figure 6.2). The reasons for the rapidly deteriorating quality of the environment were similar to those in other state socialist countries as they were deeply embedded within the logic of the state socialist development model. Environmental quality rapidly deteriorated during post-Second World War socialist industrialization, and the development of an extensive regime of accumulation focused on the rapid expansion of heavy industries largely fuelled by low-quality brown coal and lignite. Although the state socialist regime had developed a comprehensive environmental legislation to deal with the pollution problems, it had not been efficient in enforcing its own strict pollution limits. The state socialist planners had always considered production to be primary and feared that too much environmental consideration would endanger the plan fulfilment (see e.g. Carter 1985, 1993; Pavlínek 1992, 1995, 1997; Vaněk 1996; Tickle and Vavroušek 1998).

The goal of this chapter is to provide a brief assessment of the environmental effects of the post-communist transformation in the Czech Republic that took place after 1989. The collapse of the state socialist regime in Czechoslovakia was understood by many as a historic opportunity to end the environmental degradation associated with its state socialist model and to launch a more environmentally sustainable future. However, disagreements occurred almost immediately over how to achieve this goal. For neo-liberals, the mere introduction of a market economy would lead to rapid environmental clean-up. Others believed that a more sophisticated approach toward environmental reconstruction was needed. Two contrasting views of the post-1989 period in terms of its environmental effects have been presented. First, many politicians and governmental officials consider the transformation to be a complete success in terms of its environmental outcomes and they believe it led to a remarkable environmental recovery (e.g. Holman 1995, p.5). They point toward rapidly declining pollution levels and improving environmental indicators as the evidence of this 'success'. The second view,

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Environmental Problems of East Central Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgement xvii
  • Abbreviations xviii
  • Part I - Context 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • References 16
  • 2 - Environmental Politics and Transition 22
  • References 37
  • 3 - Environmental Movements, Nation States and Globalisation 40
  • 4 - The Central Importance of the European Union 56
  • References 89
  • 5 - The Soviet Union and the Successor States 92
  • Part II - Country Studies 117
  • 6 - Czech Republic 119
  • 7 - East Germany 139
  • References 155
  • 8 - Hungary 157
  • References 180
  • 9 - Poland 183
  • References 203
  • 10 - Slovakia 207
  • 11 - Slovenia 228
  • References 246
  • Part III - Country Studies 249
  • 12 - Albania 251
  • References 277
  • 13 - Bosnia and Hercegovina 283
  • Note 303
  • 14 - Bulgaria 305
  • 15 - Croatia 330
  • 16 - Macedonia 347
  • References 364
  • 17 - Romania 366
  • References 391
  • 18 - Yugoslavia 396
  • Part IV - Conclusion 417
  • 19 - Conclusion 419
  • References 431
  • Index 433
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 442

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.