Introducing Children's Literature: From Romanticism to Postmodernism

By Deborah Cogan Thacker; Jean Webb | Go to book overview

Index

a
Adams, Richard:
Watership Down7
adult fiction:
Modernist articulation of childhood 102 , 105 ;
Victorian focus on childhood 42 , 51
adult/child relationship:
and author/child reader relationship 3 , 13 , 76 -7, 79 , 81 , 112 , 135 , 139 ;
defamiliarisation of in The Borrowers134 ;
postmodern concern with 146 , 148
adults:
fin de siècle fascination with childhood 75 ;
nineteenth-century debates about children 13 - 14 ;
as readers of children's books 6 - 7 , 41 -2, 45 , 51 , 54 , 146 , 147 ;
readership of A.A. Milne's books 75 , 78 , 103 -4;
separation from children's experience 55 , 101
adventure stories 53 , 54 , 83 , 91 , 108 ;
Rowling's homage to 147 ;
Twain's ironic approach 49
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Twain) 49 , 52 , 102
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Twain) 49 , 51
Aesop's fables 19 , 143
aesthetic concerns:
relevance of children's literature 2 , 3 , 15 , 73 , 150 ;
Romanticism 4 , 5 , 14
African folk literature 8
Ahlberg, Allan and Janet:
Each, Peach, Pear Plum158 ;
Jolly Postman series 143
Alcott, Bronson 33
Alcott, Louisa May:
Little Women10 , 23 , 25 , 33 -8, 51
Alderson, Brian 56
Alger, Horatio (Jr):
impact on Baum 86 -7;
Ragged Dick54
Alice in Wonderland (Carroll) 3 , 46 , 48 , 50 , 63 -9
Alice to the Lighthouse (Dusinberre) 2 , 106
allegory:
Pilgrim's Progress and Little Women34 -5
Allsburg, Chris Van:
The Mysteries of Harris Burdick148
allusion:
in Carroll's Alice books 142 ;
in Pullman's Clockwork155
The Amber Spyglass (Pullman) 6 - 7 , 148
America:
'as child' 51 ;
Baum's views and The Wonderful Wizard of Oz85 , 86 -7, 88 -9, 90 ;
disappearance of notion of childhood 147 ;
fin desièclemood74 ;
gradual eroding of Romanticism 52 ;
positive aspect of Modernism 106 ;
values of home and self-determination 54 , 85 , 89 , 109 , 123 ;
writers' anxiety about Gilded Age 84 , 87 , 89
American children's literature:
celebratory tone in early twentieth century 83 -4;
challenging of adult and commercial values 49 ;
and childlike apprehension of nature 22 -3;
connections with British children's literature 8 - 9 , 10 , 15 ;
development of 15 - 16 ;
impact of world events in 1950s 110 ;
in interwar period of economic hardship 109 ;
postmodern subversion of fairy tales 143 ,

-177-

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