The Ethiopian Jewish Exodus: Narratives of the Migration Journey to Israel 1977-1985

By Gadi Benezer | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

First and foremost I wish to thank my interviewees. I am grateful for their trust in me and their willingness to let me escort them along the complex and often painful trails of their journey memories. I often admired their courage in recounting their experiences.

I am also delighted to have this opportunity to thank all interviewees of non-governmental organisations and government agencies, non-Ethiopians as well as Ethiopians, who have played a part in Operation Moses or have worked in the refugee camps in Sudan. I have interviewed them in Canada, Switzerland, England, the USA, Ethiopia and Israel. They were willing to share their observations with me and to shed light on various aspects of the journey. This has helped me in putting the journey narratives in context.

I am deeply indebted to Paul Thompson for his patient guidance throughout the various stages of the PhD study upon which this book is based. In our meetings in 'Little Greece' and 'Little Italy', two Oxford 'institutions', Paul played an important role in making this research project into an enriching and enjoyable process.

Many people have helped at different phases of the work. I would not be able to mention every one of them here but I am grateful to all of them. I would like to thank in particular Ian Craib, Richard Wilson and Ken Plummer as well as Brenda Corti at the Department of Sociology at the University of Essex. Terry Ranger and Jonathan Webber of the University of Oxford were willing to read and comment on parts of my work. Ideas within the study were also discussed with Roger Zetter, David Turton, Andrew Shaknow and Mary Chamberlain at the University of Oxford and at Oxford Brooks University I am obliged to Mary also for 'pushing' the project forward as an editor of the Routledge Studies in Memory and Narrative series of books. Robin Cohen from Warwick University contributed valuable sources to my review of the literature, as well as Vaughan Robinson at Swansea University. Deborah Dwork at Yale University encouraged me at the beginning of the project. At its initial phases I have discussed the work and worked on ways of analysis of the material with Gabriele Rosenthal, Nitza Yanai, Wolfram Fischer-Rosenthal, Dan Bar-On, Paul A. Hare, Joseph Sandler, Amia Lieblich and Yoram Bilu. I am indebted to all of them. When I chose the way to analyse the material it was Nitza in particular who made time in a very busy schedule to help me master it. I thank her wholeheartedly. My ideas included in the psycho-social chapter, including the effects of trauma, were

-ix-

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The Ethiopian Jewish Exodus: Narratives of the Migration Journey to Israel 1977-1985
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Note on Transliteration and Form xii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Context of the Journey 16
  • 3 - Interviewing and Interpreting in Crosscultural Research 39
  • 4 - The Theme of Jewish Identity 60
  • 5 - The Theme of Suffering 87
  • 6 - The Theme of Bravery and Inner Strength 120
  • 7 - The Impact of the Journey 152
  • 8 - Ethiopian Jews Encounter Israel 180
  • Concluding Remarks 199
  • Appendix 203
  • Notes 206
  • Bibliography 225
  • Index 247
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