Revolutionary Pedagogies: Cultural Politics, Instituting Education, and the Discourse of Theory

By Peter Pericles Trifonas | Go to book overview

ALL-CONSUMING IDENTITIES

Race and the Pedagogy of Resentment in the Age of Difference

Cameron McCarthyandGreg Dimitriadis

Introduction

Over the years, we have come to see multicultural-ism-as a set of propositions about identity, knowledge, power, and change in edu-cation-as a kind of normal science-as a form of disciplinarity of difference in which the matter of alterity has been effectively displaced as a supplement. On the terms of its present trajectory, multiculturalism can be properly diagnosed as a discourse of power that attempts to manage the extraordinary tensions and contradictions existing in modern life that have invaded social institutions, including the university and the school. At the heart of its achievement, multiculturalism has succeeded in freezing to the point of petrification its central object: “culture.” Within the managerial language of the university, culture has become a useful discourse of containment, a narrow discourse of ascriptive property in which particular groups are granted their nationalist histories, their knowledges, and, alas, their experts. Cultural competence then becomes powerfully deployed to blunt the pain of resource scarcity and to inoculate the hegemonic knowledge paradigms in the university from the daylight of subjugated knowledges and practices.

It is mere wish fulfillment, however, to attempt to hold still or at bay the extraordinary social currents unleashed in popular life now bearing down upon the modern subjects that inhabit contemporary industrial societies. These currents can be located, in part, in the destabilizing political economy and cultural imperatives unleashed in the push and pull of globalization and localization. On the one hand, the tensions and contradictions of economic reorganization, downsizing, and instability in the labor market have spawned paranoia and uncertainty among the working and professional classes. On the other, culture and ideology ignite the false clarity of essential place, essential home, and the attendant practices of moral and

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Revolutionary Pedagogies: Cultural Politics, Instituting Education, and the Discourse of Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • I - Cultural Politics 1
  • Diasporas Old and New 3
  • Strange Fruit 30
  • All-Consuming Identities 47
  • References 59
  • The Touch of the Past 61
  • II - Instituting Education 81
  • Where a Teaching Body 83
  • Notes 106
  • Notes 112
  • Technologies of Reason 113
  • Notes 135
  • Unthinking Whiteness 140
  • Postmodern Education and Disposable Youth 174
  • Multiple Literacies and Critical Pedagogies 196
  • Notes 218
  • III - The Discourse of Theory 223
  • The Shock of the Real 225
  • References 249
  • The Limits of Dialogue as a Critical Pedagogy 251
  • The Social Sciences as Information Technology 274
  • Responsible Practices of Academic Writing 289
  • Degrees of Freedom and Deliberations of “self” 312
  • References 349
  • Permissions 353
  • Index 359
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