Revolutionary Pedagogies: Cultural Politics, Instituting Education, and the Discourse of Theory

By Peter Pericles Trifonas | Go to book overview

WHERE A TEACHING BODY1 BEGINS AND HOW IT ENDS2

JACQUES DERRIDA

Translated by Denise Egéa-Kuehne

[We'll have more than one sign that these notes were not destined, as one says, to be published. However, nothing was to keep them concealed. What could be more public, fundamentally, and more demonstrable than teaching? What could be more exposed, if not, as is the case here, its staging [mise en scène] or its being put into question again [remise en question]? This is why-and it is my primary reason3-I accepted the offer to reproduce these notes without the slightest modification.

But there must have been other reasons since I hesitated for a long time. Indeed what could be the significance of a fragment (more or less arbitrarily cut, as with a massicot) out of one single session-and what is more the first session-bearing more than the others the mark of the inadequacies, the approximations, the programmatic generality delivered before an audience more anonymous and undetermined than ever? Why this session rather than another one, and why my continuous discourse rather than others, rather than the critical exchanges which followed? I could not settle on a response to these questions, but I finally considered that the struggle in which the GREPH is engaged today4rendered them secondary; since the proposed session refers essentially to the GREPH, why not seize indirectly [par la bande] this opportunity to make the challenges and the objectives of its work better known?

Other objection, more serious: Was my participation in this book compatible with the very subject these notes will offer for reading, at least in part and indirectly? Should I serve (or make serve) one of these numerous enterprises (here under its immediately publishable form) which multiply skirmishes against the very thing (this being said without suspecting-it is not important- all the intentions of all their agents) from which they draw their existence and whose alibis they foster? More precisely still: Do not the gathering of names, the sorting out of figures, and the exhibition of titles make clear

-83-

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Revolutionary Pedagogies: Cultural Politics, Instituting Education, and the Discourse of Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • I - Cultural Politics 1
  • Diasporas Old and New 3
  • Strange Fruit 30
  • All-Consuming Identities 47
  • References 59
  • The Touch of the Past 61
  • II - Instituting Education 81
  • Where a Teaching Body 83
  • Notes 106
  • Notes 112
  • Technologies of Reason 113
  • Notes 135
  • Unthinking Whiteness 140
  • Postmodern Education and Disposable Youth 174
  • Multiple Literacies and Critical Pedagogies 196
  • Notes 218
  • III - The Discourse of Theory 223
  • The Shock of the Real 225
  • References 249
  • The Limits of Dialogue as a Critical Pedagogy 251
  • The Social Sciences as Information Technology 274
  • Responsible Practices of Academic Writing 289
  • Degrees of Freedom and Deliberations of “self” 312
  • References 349
  • Permissions 353
  • Index 359
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