The Longest Night: Polemics and Perspectives on Election 2000

By Arthur J. Jacobson; Michel Rosenfeld | Go to book overview

18
DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA:
A EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVE ON
THE MILLENNIAL ELECTION

There are still many for whom the basic constitutional structure of the United States is regarded as an attractive model for what the European Union ought to become. The attraction of the United States in this respect is obvious. The political structure established by the U.S. Constitution is perceived as having provided a remarkably stable institutional framework over a span of more than two centuries. During this time, the United States was able to develop from little more than a coalition of rebellious colonies into a global power whose cultural appeal, scientific prowess, economic prosperity, political clout, and military might have few if any historical equals. Most important, the U.S. Constitution as it is understood and interpreted today has established a federal system based on the universally appealing principles of liberty, equality, democracy, and the rule of law— the very principles the European Union professes to be based on. From this point of view, when the presidential election gives rise to intense public debate and a barrage of litigation, ultimately resolved by the Supreme Court on constitutional grounds, important lessons of principle promise to be learned. Given the extensive debates in Europe about how to constitutionally organize democracy on the level of the European Union, such lessons would promise to be both timely and useful.

There are a variety of claims that undermine the idea that there is anything of interest that could be learned from looking at the United States generally and the events surrounding the 2000 election specifically. They all have in common that they are based on an exceptionalist account of either American democracy or European constitutionalism. First, there are two kinds of exceptionalist claims focusing on political culture. According to these accounts, nothing can be gained by engaging in a comparative endeavor because American democracy is exceptional. American democracy

-332-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Longest Night: Polemics and Perspectives on Election 2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 417

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.