Cultural Politics in Polybius's Histories

By Craige B. Champion | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I wish to thank the Dean's office at Allegheny College, my former academic home, for generously funding my annual summer research trips to Princeton. I also thank the Department of Classics at Princeton University and the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study for making their excellent research facilities readily available to me.

I have benefited from association with a number of scholars. My dissertation adviser at Princeton, T. James Luce, Jr., strengthened my appreciation of historiographical problems in classical historians and also provided a model for how an excellent scholar can also be humane and unpretentious. My former colleagues Robert D. English and Joshua Searle-White sharpened my understanding of the formation of national and ethnic identities. Christian Habicht graciously consented to instruct me in Greek epigraphy as my Special Field during my graduate studies. R. Elaine Fantham and Brent D. Shaw have been constant supporters of my work. My friends and former colleagues James C. Hogan and Samuel K. Edwards always had time to listen to my ideas and provide constructive criticism. Noel Lenski, Al Bertrand, and Jochen Twele read earlier drafts of this book, and their astute observations allowed me to make it a much better one. Robert Morstein-Marx kindly allowed me to read his manuscript on late republican contiones before its publication, permitting me to sharpen some of the arguments in chapter 7.

There are also nonscholarly debts to record. My parents, Clifford and Madeleine Champion, enabled me to pursue my own path. Cathy Carroll supported me in my professional career in manifold ways. Martina Champion has been the most positive force in my life, and she and our daughters, Laura and Maya, have continuously exhibited their love and patience over the years it has taken me to write this book.

I must extend special thanks to several scholars who have helped me to

-xi-

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