Liberty and Locality in Revolutionary France: Six Villages Compared, 1760-1820

By Peter Jones | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
A new civic landscape

In the closing months of 1814 the mayor of Neuviller received an administrative instruction to revert to pre-revolutionary usage as far as the name of his village was concerned. A municipal seal arrived which was inscribed 'Chaumont-sur-Moselle'. Maurice Jordy, the mayor and new owner of the chateau, demurred, albeit circumspectly. Choosing his arguments with care, Jordy pointed out that the descendants of the Chaumont de La Galaizières no longer possessed any property in the village, which featured in all the postal directories as 'Neuviller-sur-Moselle'. Moreover, the name 'Chaumont' had caused endless confusion to the authorities, with mail being misdirected to Chaumont-en-Bassigny. He did not, at this stage, explain the circumstances that had prompted the change in the first place; nor did he disclose the real reasons for his reluctance to contemplate a switch of nomenclature. With the return to power of Napoleon a few months later, the whole matter could be safely ignored, or so it seemed. The white flag of the Bourbons was lowered from the church tower and replaced with the tricolour, the seal pushed to the back of a drawer. Military defeat at Waterloo would turn the wheel of fortune in favour of the Bourbons once more, however. In the face of renewed pressure from the subprefect of Lunéville, Jordy now spelled out the reasoning behind his opposition to the proposed name change. Such a policy 'rappelloient des temps qui doivent être oubliés'.1 This time the reference was impossible to mistake and the subprefect referred the matter to his administrative superiors. In Nancy wiser counsels were brought to bear on the issue. On 14 October 1815 the prefect ruled that it would not be expedient to force a name change on the inhabitants of Neuviller 'qui rappeleraient des tems de la féodalité ou des privilèges seigneuriaux. Les malveillants ne manqueraient pas d'en profiter pour alarmer les habitans des campagnes.'2

____________________
1
A. D. de Meurthe-et-Moselle, 1M 625, Mayor [Jordy] of Neuviller to the prefect of the Meurthe, Neuviller, 28 September 1815.
2
Ibid., Prefect of the Meurthe to subprefect of Lunéville [draft], Nancy, 14 October 1815.

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liberty and Locality in Revolutionary France: Six Villages Compared, 1760-1820
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Studies in European History *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Tables xii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Mise-En-Scène 10
  • Chapter 2 - The Structures of Village Life Towards the End of the Ancien Régime 48
  • Chapter 3 - Agendas for Change: 1787–1790 85
  • Chapter 4 - A New Civic Landscape 119
  • Chapter 5 - Sovereignty in the Village 163
  • Chapter 6 - Church and State in Miniature 201
  • Chapter 7 - Land of Liberty? 231
  • Conclusion 266
  • Bibliography 274
  • Index 302
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.