The First Jewish Revolt: Archaeology, History, and Ideology

By Andrea M. Berlin; J. Andrew Overman | Go to book overview

1

Current scholarship on the First Revolt

Martin Goodman

The last ten years has seen the publication of only one monograph specifically dedicated to the First Revolt, the detailed study by Jonathan Price of the history of the groups which struggled for control within Jerusalem during the war (Price 1992), but there has also been a plethora of smaller-scale studies on particular aspects of the Revolt. The main focus of these investigations has been in four areas: the value of Josephus's narrative as a historical source; the status in Jewish society of the leaders of the rebellion; the ideology of the rebels; and the aftermath of the war (on the ideology of the rebels, see Chapter 3 by Freyne on Galilee and Idumea and Chapter 4 by Berlin on Galilee, in this volume). It seems fair to state that, despite considerable progress in each of these areas, no consensus has been reached, so that it is not yet really time for a new synthesis to be attempted. Nor, despite the light shed on many interesting side issues by excavations, have recent archaeological investigations and the welcome publication of the final reports from sites such as Masada up to now had a major impact on the direction of research, in contrast to the role played by archaeology in the recent study of the Bar Kokhba Revolt. What is offered here is an indication of the direction in which current scholarship seems to be heading and some suggestions for the future.

The debate about the value of Josephus's history as a source is in some respects quite obviously fundamental. So much of our knowledge depends on his narrative that each attack on his veracity threatens to undermine study of the subject altogether. It is worthwhile speculating on how deep our ignorance would be if only the rabbinic and classical pagan sources about the Revolt survived. We would know there had been a great uprising, that the rebels were divided into factions, that Titus destroyed the Temple, and that Yohanan ben Zakkai fled from Jerusalem, but for any more complex explanation of these events there would be no real clue. The veracity of Josephus is most obviously called into question by the discrepancies between the Life and the War; attempts by Tessa Rajak to downplay the significance of such discrepancies by attributing them to different perspectives on the same events (Rajak 1984) have not been universally accepted. More generally, there has been a huge upsurge in the study of Josephus's historical method

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The First Jewish Revolt: Archaeology, History, and Ideology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.