The First Jewish Revolt: Archaeology, History, and Ideology

By Andrea M. Berlin; J. Andrew Overman | Go to book overview

8

Yodefat/Jotapata

The archaeology of the first battle

Mordechai Aviam

Josephus names Yodefat as the first town on the list of fortified settlements in the Galilee (War 20.6), and he mentions it many times thereafter in the War as well as in his Life. The site is located on an isolated hill in the Lower Galilee near the modern Moshav Yodefat (Fig. 8.1). Although the site was identified in the last century, it was not excavated until 1992, primarily because scholars thought that it had been badly destroyed and further eroded by nature. In six seasons of excavations beginning in 1992, however, we uncovered the remains of a fourteen-acre town occupied from late Hellenistic through early Roman times (Adan-Bayewitz and Aviam 1997). About one-third of the town was built on four or five large terraces on the steep eastern slope, another third of it was built on the crest of the rounded hill and its southern slope, and the rest on the southern plateau (Fig. 8.2). Five residential areas were excavated, containing modest private dwellings with cisterns, ritual baths (miqva'ot), storage areas, cooking ovens, pressing installations, loom weights, spindle whorls, clay and stone vessels, and coins. We also excavated pottery kilns, an oil press in a cave, and part of a luxurious mansion with frescoed walls and floors. The latest securely identifiable object found throughout these areas is a coin found on one of the floors from the reign of the Roman emperor Nero. This piece of datable evidence correlates precisely with the story of the battle of Yodefat-its siege, fall, and the aftermath, which is the second longest battle description given by Josephus (the battle of Jerusalem is the longest) (War 141-218, 316-408, 432-42). The battle of Yodefat, as described by Josephus, is also the second bloodiest of the battles of the Revolt, again after Jerusalem, as well as the third longest siege, after Jerusalem and Masada. Many scholars have noted that the attention that Josephus lavished on his account may well be suspect, considering his own role in the city's defensive preparations as well as his subsequent and infamous behavior (see the detailed discussion in Chapter 6 by Horsely in this volume). It is reasonable, therefore, to examine the archaeological evidence for the siege, the battle, and the city's demise in tandem with Josephus's narrative, in order that specific discrepancies and/or points of agreement be made clear.

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The First Jewish Revolt: Archaeology, History, and Ideology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.