Architecture and Revolution: Contemporary Perspectives on Central and Eastern Europe

By Neil Leach | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Much of the material for this book emerged from a conference held in Romania in 1995. The conference took place against the extraordinary backdrop of Bucharest, a city violated by the architectural interventions of the former communist dictator, Nicolai Ceausescu, and a city whose architecture is itself scarred by bullet holes that bear witness to the bloody 'revolution' that took place in December 1989.

The conference bore the title, 'Beyond the Wall'. It was a conference which took place both geographically and temporally beyond the wall. Likewise it sought to transcend walls-or boundaries-between different cultures and different disciplines, by bringing together architects, philosophers and cultural theorists from both the East and the West. This was the first such conference to be held since the collapse of communism, and while the event itself was staged in Romania, it addressed pressing questions concerning architecture and the built environment that related to the whole of Central and Eastern Europe.

I am grateful to all those who took part in this conference, and to those who contributed to this volume. I am particulary grateful to all those who helped in the organisation of the conference. Most especially I must thank my conference co-organiser, Mariana Celac, for her tireless work in managing the logistics of the event in often very difficult circumstances. Likewise I should like to thank the support team in Bucharest, notably Augustin Ioan and Alexandru Beldiman, the president of the Union of Romanian Architects.

I must also thank our sponsors, the Soros Foundation for a Free Society, the British Council and the NEC Group. It was only through their generous spon-sorship that such an event was possible.

Finally, I must thank my editors at Routledge, especially Tristan Palmer for his vision in setting up this publication, and Sarah Lloyd for seeing it through to completion.

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Architecture and Revolution: Contemporary Perspectives on Central and Eastern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.