Architecture and Revolution: Contemporary Perspectives on Central and Eastern Europe

By Neil Leach | Go to book overview

9

Traces of the unborn

Daniel Libeskind

For some time now I have been working on a project I have termed the 'Traces of the Unborn', a term describing the need to resist the erasure of history, the need to respond to history, the need to open the future: that is, to delineate the invisible on the basis of the visible. Out of this meditation I have developed certain planning and architectural concepts which reflect my interest and commitment to the memory of the city, to the time in which it dwells, and to the freedom it represents.

Even if anywhere-becoming-somewhere arrives, the age of the closure of sites might yet bid farewell to 'genius loci' that idol of politics, the ultimate ontotheological component of Architecture Appropriated.

The consideration of these issues with respect to the future development of the contemporary city raises fundamental questions concerning damage to urban fabrics past, present and future, whether this damage is caused by war, economic conditions or political ideology. Faced with these conditions, contemporary urbanism must leave aside conventional forms of contextualism and utopianism in favour of strategies enabling the transformation and metamorphosis of existing realities which take the discontinuity of the city as a positive point of departure for the construction of new urban perspectives.

The 'genius loci' is but a realm invested with twenty centuries of metaphysical oppression masking the impotence of ecumenic empires to control places and the human addition to the orientation of space

There is an important need in every society for icons which constitute a particular area, the structures which form the texture of living memory In refuting the past and the future alike, the eternal present of transformation and metamorphosis must be incorporated in an urban framework which encourages the creation of unpredictable, flexible and hybrid architectures. At the same time the given should not be treated as an obstacle or as a form of pathology, but rather as an opportunity pregnant with new relations and urban experiences.

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Architecture and Revolution: Contemporary Perspectives on Central and Eastern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.