Teaching Secondary English: Readings and Applications

By Daniel Sheridan | Go to book overview
our own and our students' writing, and realizing that liking need not get in the way of clear-eyed evaluation.

Works Cited

Diederich, Paul. Measuring Growth in English. Urbana: NCTE, 1974.

Belanoff, Pat, and Peter Elbow. “Using Portfolios to Increase Collaboration and Community in a Writing Program.” WPA: Journal of Writing Program Administration 9.3 (Spring 1986): 27–40. (Also in Portfolios: Process and Product. Ed. Pat Belanoff and Marcia Dickson. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook-Heinemann, 1991.)

Belanoff, Pat, Peter Elbow, and Sheryl Fontaine, eds. Nothing Begins with N: New Investigations of Freewriting. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1991.

Bishop, Wendy. Something Old, Something New: College Writing Teachers and Classroom Change. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1990.

. Released into Language: Options for Teaching Creative Writing. Urbana: NCTE, 1990.

Elbow, Peter. “The Danger of Softness.” What Is English? New York: MLA, 1990. 197–210.

Elbow, Peter, and Pat Belanoff. “State University of New York: Portfolio-Based Evaluation Program.” New Methods in College Writing Programs: Theory into Practice. Ed. Paul Connolly and Teresa Vilardi. New York: MLA, 1986. 95–105. (Also in Portfolios: Process and Product. Ed. Pat Belanoff and Marcia Dickson. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook-Heinemann, 1991.)

Gardner, Howard. Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York: Basic, 1983.

Kirschenbaum, Howard, Simon Sidney, and Rodney Napier. Wad-Ja-Get? The Grading Game in American Education. New York: Hart Publishing, 1971.

Lewis, C. S. Studies in Words. 2d ed. London: Cambridge UP, 1967.

Portfolio Assessment Newsletter. Five Centerpointe Drive, Suite 100, Lake Oswego, Oregon 97035.

Portfolio News. c/o San Dieguito Union High School District, 710 Encinitas Boulevard, Encinitas, CA 92024.

Smith, Barbara Herrnstein. Contingencies of Value: Alternative Perspectives for Critical Theory. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1988.

White, Edward M. Teaching and Assessing Writing. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1985.

Zak, Frances. “Exclusively Positive Responses to Student Writing.” Journal of Basic Writing 9.2 (1990): 40–53.


For Further Thought

1. How does Elbow define ranking? (It's broader than the usual meaning of the term.) Do you agree with his negative view of this form of assessment? Comment on Elbow's idea that our society has a “hunger to rank.”

2. In your own experience, how did it feel to have your writing ranked? (If you aspire to teach English, it is possible that your work was always ranked high. How might it have felt to a less capable writer?) What form of assessment seemed to help you most? Why?

3. Comment on Elbow's willingness to compromise with minimal forms of ranking or an analytic grid. What kind of compromises could you see yourself making? At this stage in your career, what kind of grading system do you think you would use for student writing?

4. Elbow is famous for stating things that many teachers believe but don't want to admit. Take his idea of “liking.” Discuss his premise: “It's not improvement that leads to liking, but rather liking that leads to improvement.” How convincing is his case for using this idea in the classroom?

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching Secondary English: Readings and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - English Teachers 1
  • Works Cited 13
  • For Further Reading 23
  • 2 - Reading Literature 25
  • Works Cited 51
  • References 66
  • For Further Reading 80
  • 3 - Choosing Texts 82
  • Works Cited 105
  • References 132
  • 4 - Teaching Writing 134
  • Works Cited 175
  • 5 - Teaching About Language 215
  • Further Study 232
  • References 249
  • 6 - Joining the Profession 295
  • References 303
  • Appendixes 313
  • Author Index 365
  • Subject Index 369
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.