Teaching Secondary English: Readings and Applications

By Daniel Sheridan | Go to book overview

Appendixes

The six appendixes that follow consist of assignments given by secondary teachers and samples of the work students did in response to them. The assignments have been rewritten for the sake of regularity and clarity, but I have tried to remain true to the spirit and main idea of the originals. For the sake of anonymity, I have changed the names of the student authors, other students, and their schools. Otherwise, the student papers are just the way they were submitted–with the exception of the rough drafts, which have been adapted from the originals. Again with the exception of the rough draft adaptations, the papers are reprinted here with the permission of the students who wrote them.

In general, I tried to select a sampling of high, middle, and low papers from each set, but that does not mean that they follow a particular “curve.” For one thing, the classes of students who wrote them, though nominally homogeneous, were actually quite varied in ability. Nor did I have grades in mind when I chose them. Rather, I worked holistically, looking for a variety of topics, issues for the teacher, and writing abilities.

Some of these papers appeared in the first edition of Teaching Secondary English, and a few readers (not just students) have suggested that they do not represent the complete range of writing abilities among American secondary students. In particular, a colleague who teaches an English methods course in a large city made such a comment. It is interesting to note that she did not say which ability levels were missing. I haven't asked, and I still don't know. My own students at the University of North Dakota often complain that this student work is almost universally “bad, ” though some change their minds when they confront the realities of student writing in real classrooms. My colleague from the big city might well have thought that the writing was too “good.”

-313-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching Secondary English: Readings and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - English Teachers 1
  • Works Cited 13
  • For Further Reading 23
  • 2 - Reading Literature 25
  • Works Cited 51
  • References 66
  • For Further Reading 80
  • 3 - Choosing Texts 82
  • Works Cited 105
  • References 132
  • 4 - Teaching Writing 134
  • Works Cited 175
  • 5 - Teaching About Language 215
  • Further Study 232
  • References 249
  • 6 - Joining the Profession 295
  • References 303
  • Appendixes 313
  • Author Index 365
  • Subject Index 369
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.