From Management Education to Civic Reconstruction: The Emerging Ecology of Organizations

By Ronnie Lessem; Sudhanshu Palsule | Go to book overview

2

From business school to learning society

Britain's role in the twenty-first century

INTRODUCTION: EDUCATION FOR WHOM?

As we have indicated in chapter 1, first-and specifically through our knowledge creating ecology-we want to enhance the relationship between our business school and the organizations it serves. Second, and more generally, we want to metamorphose the practice of management and indeed executive education, so that it adds organizational and societal value directly, rather than only indirectly through the individual's growth and development. In both cases, moreover, such pragmatically and rationally based management education and business administration will need to be altogether reconstituted.

As I have also indicated, in the course of uncovering 'European management systems', I came across an anomaly. For in uncovering major philosophical systems that have since become the hallmark of our 'Four Worlds Institute', it struck me, as a management educator and would-be organizational ecologist, that only one of these, that is 'western' pragmatism, was directly oriented towards the individual. In fact, I was taken aback, during my own postgraduate education, by the difference in emphasis between Harvard Business School and the London School of Economics. Whereas the educational orientation at the LSE was intensely individualistic, and thus thoroughly and pragmatically Anglo-Saxon, this was evidently not the case at Harvard, where the approach was much more group-focused and institutionally oriented. My own place of birth, to add a third business-pheric dimension, was an English colony, Southern Rhodesia, present-day Zimbabwe.

In an indigenous African setting, which we have termed in our recent work humanistic, 1 the community has primacy over the individual. In rural Africa, the pre-school education of the child takes place within a richly social setting. This in fact changes when the child goes to secondary school, but such schooling of course is based on a 'western' model.

Things should have been different in the 'east', at least amongst the Pacific Tigers where the colonial heritage was somewhat less obvious than was the case in Africa. Well not quite. We know that the Japanese approach to

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From Management Education to Civic Reconstruction: The Emerging Ecology of Organizations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - Knowledge Creating Ecology 3
  • 2 - From Business School to Learning Society 20
  • 3 - Organizational Ecology 41
  • 4 - Ordinary and Extraordinary Management 67
  • 5 - Work and Soul 90
  • 6 - Towards the Individualized Corporation 101
  • 7 - From Crisis to Awakening 122
  • 8 - The Age of Business Ecosystems 144
  • 9 - The Stories We Are 161
  • 10 - The Development Spectrum 173
  • 11 - Information Space 187
  • 12 - Spiral Dynamics 201
  • 13 - Freeing Up Societies 221
  • 14 - Communities at Peace 240
  • 15 - Enhancing Life Through Water 264
  • 16 - Sustainable Development 289
  • 17 - Entering the Catalytic Zone 311
  • Index 333
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