From Management Education to Civic Reconstruction: The Emerging Ecology of Organizations

By Ronnie Lessem; Sudhanshu Palsule | Go to book overview

12

Spiral dynamics

Relational justice at Thames Valley

THE ORGANIZATION

Background to restorative justice

On 1 April 1998, Thames Valley Police in Britain launched a new forcewide initiative based upon restorative justice: any offenders who are eligible for caution (as opposed to court prosecution) will have to come to terms with the impact their behaviour has on their victim and any other relevant parties. This meeting will end with an offer of reparation which may be an apology or a specified action as a means of symbolically repairing the harm done. Restorative justice, adapted from the traditional Maori practice of relational justice in New Zealand, represents a major departure in a traditional British police force's crime strategy. In fact, in October 1997, Home Secretary Jack Straw had attended such an offender-victim 'conference', and, impressed by what he saw, declared to the House of Commons within a few weeks that restorative justice should be written into the Crime and Disorder Bill, making it incumbent on all British police forces to adopt it as common practice.

Restorative justice empowers communities in a process which the formal system normally precludes. Offenders are induced to feel a real sense of shame for what they did. As a result an authentic desire tends to emerge to restore the bonds of community and reintegrate the offender into relationships of mutual support. Victims-as Boyd Rodger, our MMBA from Thames Valley who has had a lot of experience with restorative justice affirms-are part of this form of justice, which as a consequence can help heal a lingering sense of dislocation and fear. Such justice, as Boyd has intimated, is normal to the Maoris. Their traditional sense of community considers everyone to be harmed when a crime is committed.

A crime is not regarded as an offence against the state, therefore the whole community is involved in understanding what happened and agreeing appropriate reparation. Importantly, in the context of restoring meaningful relationships, the offender experiences shame. This may appear to be a world apart from the Home Counties of Thames Valley, but there is an

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From Management Education to Civic Reconstruction: The Emerging Ecology of Organizations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - Knowledge Creating Ecology 3
  • 2 - From Business School to Learning Society 20
  • 3 - Organizational Ecology 41
  • 4 - Ordinary and Extraordinary Management 67
  • 5 - Work and Soul 90
  • 6 - Towards the Individualized Corporation 101
  • 7 - From Crisis to Awakening 122
  • 8 - The Age of Business Ecosystems 144
  • 9 - The Stories We Are 161
  • 10 - The Development Spectrum 173
  • 11 - Information Space 187
  • 12 - Spiral Dynamics 201
  • 13 - Freeing Up Societies 221
  • 14 - Communities at Peace 240
  • 15 - Enhancing Life Through Water 264
  • 16 - Sustainable Development 289
  • 17 - Entering the Catalytic Zone 311
  • Index 333
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