The Romans: From Village to Empire

By Mary T. Boatwright; Daniel J. Gargola et al. | Go to book overview

PRINCIPAL ANCIENT AUTHORS

This list aims to be no more than a concise identification of the principal authors mentioned in the book, together with a few anonymous writings (under their commonly used titles). The list omits three categories, however: nonhistorical authors whose writings are of lesser significance for modern readers new to Roman history; historical authors (such as Herodotus and Thucydides) whose subject is not related to Rome; and historical authors whose work is entirely, or almost entirely, lost.

An English translation is cited only in those instances where none is readily available in any of the standard series, such as the Loeb Classical Library (Harvard University Press), Oxford World's Classics, Penguin Classics, or (for the third century A.D. onwards) Translated Texts for Historians (Liverpool University Press).

For further information in every case, consult, for example, the appropriate entry in OCD. A wide range of translated extracts from authors (including fragments), along with inscriptions, papyri, and coin legends, is assembled in sourcebooks such as Lewis, Naphtali, and Meyer Reinhold. 1990 (third edition). Roman Civilization, vol. 1 The Republic and the Augustan Age, vol. 2 The Empire. New York: Columbia University Press.

*Acts of the Apostles: Fifth book of the New Testament, written by Luke, author of the third gospel, outlining the mission of the Church from Christ's ascension to Paul's visit to Rome around 62. This work—most likely to date to the 80s—was evidently not known to contemporary Roman authors. 491

____________________
*
Authors who write in Greek (rather than Latin) are asterisked.

-491-

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The Romans: From Village to Empire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Maps xv
  • Figures xvii
  • Preface xxi
  • Acknowledgments xxv
  • Notes to the Reader xxvii
  • 1 - Early Italy 1
  • 2 - Rome's First Centuries 32
  • 3 - Rome and Italy in the Fourth Century 58
  • 4 - The Beginnings of a Mediterranean Empire 97
  • 5 - Italy and Empire 136
  • 6 - Italy Threatened, Enfranchised, Divided 166
  • 7 - The Domination of Sulla and Its Legacy 193
  • 8 - Caesar's Dictatorship 225
  • 9 - Augustus and the Transformation of the Roman World 267
  • 10 - The Julio-Claudians, the Civil War of 68–69, and Life in the Early Empire 317
  • 11 - Military Expansion and Its Limits, the Empire and the Provinces (69–138) 353
  • 12 - Civil and Military Affairs (138–235) 393
  • 13 - The Third Century, the Dominate, and Constantine 431
  • Timeline 459
  • Glossary 479
  • Principal Ancient Authors 491
  • Art Credits 499
  • Index 501
  • Gazetteer 513
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