From Babel to Dragomans: Interpreting the Middle East

By Bernard Lewis | Go to book overview
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From Babel to Dragomans: Interpreting the Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Credits ix
  • From Babel to Dragomans *
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Past History 13
  • 1 - An Islamic Mosque 15
  • 2 - From Babel to Dragomans 18
  • Notes 31
  • 3 - Middle East Feasts 33
  • 4 - Iran in History 43
  • 5 - Christian, Muslim and Secular Diaspora 53
  • 6 - Some Notes on Land, Money and Power in Medieval Islam 60
  • 7 - An Interpretation of Fatimid History 66
  • Notes 76
  • 8 - A Preliminary Classification 79
  • Notes 90
  • 9 - Monarchy in the Middle East 92
  • Notes 98
  • 10 - Religion and Murder in the Middle East 100
  • Notes 106
  • 11 - The Mughals and the Ottomans 108
  • 12 - The Civilization of the Ottoman Empire 115
  • 13 - Muslim Perceptions and Experience 121
  • 14 - Cold War and Détente in the 16th Century 135
  • 15 - A Survey of Middle Eastern Travel 137
  • Notes 150
  • 16 - Address to a Meeting in Jerusalem 152
  • 17 - Pan-Arabism 156
  • 18 - The Emergence of Modern Israel 181
  • 19 - Orientalist Notes on the Soviet-United Arab Republic Treaty of 27 May 1971 188
  • Notes 194
  • 20 - A Taxonomy of Group Hatred 196
  • 21 - Islam and the West 205
  • Notes 216
  • Part Two - Current History 219
  • 22 - The Middle East, Westernized Despite Itself 221
  • 23 - The Middle East in World Affairs 232
  • 24 - Reflections After a War 240
  • 25 - Return to Cairo 247
  • 26 - Middle East at Prayer 265
  • 27 - At the United Nations 269
  • 28 - The Anti-Zionist Resolution 274
  • 29 - Right and Left in Lebanon 284
  • 30 - The Shica 290
  • 31 - Islamic Revolution 299
  • 32 - The Enemies of God 313
  • 33 - The Roots of Muslim Rage 319
  • 34 - The Other Middle East Problems 332
  • 35 - Power, Weakness, and Choices in the Middle East 343
  • 36 - The Law of Islam 351
  • 37 - Not Everybody Hates Saddam 354
  • 38 - Pawns No Longer in Imperial Games 357
  • 39 - What Saddam Wrought 360
  • 40 - The “sick Man” of Today Coughs Closer to Home 364
  • 41 - Revisiting the Paradox of Modern Turkey 367
  • 42 - We Must Be Clear 369
  • 43 - Deconstructing Osama and His Evil Appeal 371
  • 44 - Targeted by a History of Hatred 374
  • 45 - A Time for Toppling 378
  • Part Three - About History 381
  • 46 - In Defense of History 383
  • 47 - First-Person Narrative in the Middle East 396
  • 48 - Reflections on Islamic Historiography 405
  • 49 - A Source for European History 414
  • Notes 419
  • 50 - History Writing and National Revival in Turkey 421
  • 51 - On Occidentalism and Orientalism 430
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