Abortion, Sin, and the State in Thailand

By Andrea Whittaker | Go to book overview

Notes

1

Introduction: bearing politics

1
For example, in a recent seminar on the issue Ahamat Khamthethong from the Muslim Media Association and Lamduan Chinamanopan from a Catholic agency both disputed the use of the terms human rights and personal freedom on the abortion issue and emphasised the need to view it as a moral issue within Thai cultural values (Population Council and Reproductive Health Advocacy Network 2000).
2
A number of prominent NGOs and movements such as the 'Assembly of the Poor' promote the concept of human rights and rights to livelihoods in response to environmental and social issues.

2

Abortion, sin and the state

1
The definition of health in the legislation is ambiguous, but is generally interpreted to mean a woman's physical health.
2
The majority of research on the issue in Thailand occurred during the late 1970s and early 1980s, coinciding with the unsuccessful attempts to liberalise the abortion laws. These studies provided important public health information documenting the incidence of women resorting to illegal abortions, the health consequences and measures of risk, morbidity and mortality, characteristics of women who abort and correlations with contraceptive use and family planning, and the practices and characteristics of abortion practitioners (see e.g. Rattakul 1971, Toongsuwan et al. 1973, Burnight and Leoprapai 1977, Koetsawang et al. 1978, Rauyajin 1979, Chaturachinda et al. 1981, Pongthai et al. 1984, Thailand, Ministry of Public Health 1984, Pinchun and Chullapram 1993).
3
The survey sample was predominated by married women (98 per cent had ever been married and 92 per cent were currently married) with an average age of 31 years.
4
See the newspaper article 'Abortion drug now restricted' The Nation, 26 February 2002.
5
Taking life means to murder anything that lives. It refers to the striking and killing of living beings…'Taking life' is then the will to kill anything that once perceives as having life, to act so as to terminate the life=force in it, in so far as the will finds expression in bodily action or in speech. With regard to animals it is worse to kill large ones than small. Because a more extensive effort is involved. Even where the effort is the same, the difference in substance must be considered. In the case of humans the killing is the more blameworthy the more virtuous they are. Apart from that, the extent of the offence is proportionate to the intensity of the wish to kill (quoted in Florida 1999:16).
6
Compare this description for example with the translation of the Samyutta Nikkaya commentary in the Saratthapakasini (McDermott 1999:171). This early Buddhist text describes the earliest stage of conception as the kalala which appears as a drop of oil

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abortion, Sin, and the State in Thailand
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Series Editor's Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Abortion, Sin and the State 11
  • 3 - A History of the Abortion Debate 29
  • 4 - Conceiving the Nation 66
  • 5 - Corrupt Girls, Victims of Men, Desperate Women 91
  • 6 - 'A Small Sin' 109
  • 7 - 'the Truth of Our Day-By-Day Lives' 129
  • 8 - Global Debates, Local Dilemmas 148
  • Appendix I 158
  • Appendix II 161
  • Glossary of Thai Terms 163
  • Notes 165
  • Bibliography 176
  • Index 187
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 189

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.