The Alevis in Turkey: The Emergence of a Secular Islamic Tradition

By David Shankland | Go to book overview

4

SUSESİ

An Alevi community

The Alevi villagers in the sub-province, just as do the Sunni, live in nuclear settlements. Each predominantly consists of patrilineal, patrilocal households whose members usually own any fields that they may till. Each settlement pursues its own rotation cycle and households of one settlement only rarely possess fields in the territory of another. However, the number of households in each Alevi settlement is less than in the Sunni villages. I would estimate the average Alevi settlement to have between fifteen and twenty households, the largest I came across was about fifty, the smallest, four.

An Alevi village, as defined by the state, comprises of a number of these settlements, which the villagers refer to as 'mahalle', village quarter. No Alevi village in the sub-province has less than two distinct and separate mahalles; Susesi has seven, the closest village, ten. The most I found in a single village was twenty-two. Figure 4.1 shows Susesi and the two immediate neighbouring villages, both Alevi also. The scale is approximate, I made the map by walking and travelling over the ground. The track running up from the road passes through scrub for about 2 kilometres, then turns and rises steeply through fields up to the village, passes through, and still rising steeply splits, one fork going to Göz, the other to Ekmek, the two immediately neighbouring villages. These three Alevi villages have little contact with the immigrant Sunni village (indicated by the checked oval on Figure 4.1) though the track passes it within a few hundred metres on the way to Susesi, and its lights can be seen clearly at night across the vale.

Susesi's seven mahalles are marked as checkered squares. The other Alevi villagers in the sub-province regard these as being rather closer together than is normal for Alevi villages, nevertheless it takes at least forty minutes to walk from the lower point of the village to its upper level, and each mahalle is distinct. Even Pınar and Yüksek, which at first glance appear almost to merge into each other, are divided by gardens which fall between the houses themselves. The two mahalles of Göz, the smaller of the two neighbouring Alevi villages, are about 20 minutes' walk apart and the ten of Ekmek are spread even further apart.

In Susesi, the only time of the year when the mahalle divisions are of little

-74-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Alevis in Turkey: The Emergence of a Secular Islamic Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword x
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Notes on the Text xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Alevi and Sunni in the Republic of Turkey 13
  • 2 - The Sub-Province 33
  • 3 - The Sunni Villages 50
  • 4 - Susesİ 74
  • 5 - Religion, Ritual and Social Control 94
  • 6 - Social Change and the Alevi Communities 133
  • 7 - The Alevis, Evolving Identity and the State 154
  • 8 - Conclusion 173
  • Appendix 1 186
  • Appendix 2 193
  • Appendix 3 197
  • Appendix 4 204
  • Notes 208
  • Bibliography 225
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 241

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.