Home Truths about Child Sexual Abuse: Influencing Policy and Practice - A Reader

By Catherine Itzin | Go to book overview

16

Patterns of sex offending and strategies for effective assessment and intervention

Hilary Eldridge


Introduction

Myths about the people who abuse children, and how they do it, are legion. Most common are beliefs that offenders can be stereotyped as an isolated group of sick individual men; or that sex abuse is restricted to single incidents of aberrant behaviour by otherwise ordinary men; or that it is caused by family problems. The aim of this chapter is to draw together evidence to show that the reality is quite different, and to demonstrate that accurate knowledge about offenders helps society both protect children and provide effective intervention programmes for their abusers.

The research reviewed here challenges some deeply held beliefs about the types of men who abuse children. In reality there is no type. Abusive behaviour occurs in many different situations and in different and various social groups. Those concerned with child protection need to know that diversity is the main factor characterising men who abuse children, that most sex offending takes place within the context of a relationship which the offender makes with the child in order to gain compliance and prevent disclosure, and to move away from the idea that the family itself is at fault when a child is sexually abused by a family member. Effective therapy, not only for offenders but also for those affected by abuse, recognises that offenders create or exacerbate family dysfunction in order to ensure that they can abuse undetected.

The recognition of different offending patterns is very important in establishing appropriate intervention with offenders. The thinking processes of abusers usually includes 'distorted thinking' which legitimises offending. This thinking, together with the cyclical patterns which many offenders develop, are key targets for change in effective offender intervention programmes. In summary, the aim of this chapter is to stress the importance of using knowledge of offenders to inform assessment, intervention and prevention of sex offending.

-313-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Home Truths about Child Sexual Abuse: Influencing Policy and Practice - A Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 459

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.