Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

C

cable and satellite television

The importance of developing the new media of cable and satellite as part of France's hi-tech communications revolution featured prominently on the media policy agenda of both Socialist and Gaullist governments throughout the 1980s. However, the era of multichannel cable television has been slow to arrive. By the late 1990s only about 10 per cent of French households were hooked up to a cable network. Satellite television had fared even less well, with only a handful of households equipped to receive the output of the technologically oversophisticated French direct-broadcasting satellites Télédiffusion 1 and 2. However, in the late 1990s the development of digital television looked set to give a boost to satellite television in France.

RAYMOND KUHN

See also: television


Further reading

l
Lunven, R. and Vedel, T. (1993) La Télévision de demain, Paris: Armand Colin (a detailed analysis of the new media technologies of cable and satellite).

Cabrel, Francis

b. 1953, Agen

Singer-songwriter

With his occitan (Southern French) accent, nostalgic and sometimes melancholy songs, Francis Cabrel has espoused good causes, for example, leukaemia with Il faudra leur dire (They Must be Told), and has defended his atavistic roots with Les Chevaliers cathares (The Cathar Knights). But the so-called ermite d'Astaffort (hermit of Astaffort) is perhaps most important as an outstanding lyricist, charismatic stage performer and stout defender of la chanson française (French song).

IAN PICKUP

See also: song/chanson

café theatre

Since its beginnings in the 1960s, café theatre-performed cabaret-style in cafés-has grown from a marginalized art form to one worthy of its own section in Paris events guides and a significant place at the Avignon festival, with a repertoire ranging from the classics to one-man stand-up comedy shows, and a reputation for creativity and nonconformism. Often forced to work with limited resources and space, like

-85-

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Classified Contents List xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 3
  • Further Reading 13
  • Further Reading 18
  • Further Reading 26
  • Further Reading 27
  • Further Reading 30
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 66
  • Further Reading 70
  • Major Works 79
  • C 85
  • Further Reading 91
  • Further Reading 99
  • Further Reading 111
  • Further Reading 113
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 144
  • Further Reading 150
  • Major Works 152
  • E 168
  • Further Reading 194
  • F 197
  • Further Reading 200
  • Further Reading 207
  • Major Works 214
  • Further Reading 245
  • G 252
  • Further Reading 279
  • Further Reading 280
  • H 283
  • I 290
  • Further Reading 297
  • J 302
  • Further Reading 303
  • Major Works 307
  • K 310
  • Further Reading 317
  • L 318
  • Major Works 324
  • Major Works 325
  • M 350
  • Further Reading 352
  • Further Reading 354
  • Major Works 364
  • Further Reading 379
  • Further Reading 380
  • N 388
  • Further Reading 397
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Further Reading 419
  • Major Works 424
  • Q 449
  • R 450
  • Further Reading 462
  • Further Reading 469
  • Major Works 470
  • Major Works 472
  • Further Reading 474
  • S 478
  • Further Reading 484
  • Further Reading 508
  • T 515
  • U 540
  • V 544
  • Further Reading 549
  • Further Reading 554
  • W 555
  • Further Reading 560
  • X 568
  • Y 569
  • Index 572
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