Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture

By Alex Hughes; Keith Reader | Go to book overview

See also: cinema; stars


Major works

d
Depardieu, G. (1990) Lettres volées, Paris: Livre de Poche (a semi-autobiography in the form of letters addressed to parents, industry colleagues and others; originally published 1988).

Further reading

g
Gray, M. (1991) Depardieu: A Biography, London: Warner Books.

v
Vincendeau, G. (1993) 'Gérard Depardieu: The Axiom of Contemporary French Cinema', Screen 34, 4:343-61 (a brilliant star analysis).

Derrida, Jacques

b. 1930, Algiers

Philosopher

The most celebrated and influential of contemporary French philosophers. Derrida studied at the prestigious École Normale Supérieure in Paris and was a teacher there for some twenty years (1964-84) before moving to the École Pratique des Hautes Études in 1984. He was the founding president of the Collège Internationale de Philosophie in 1983 and has also held a number of visiting professorships in the USA.

Like most philosophers of his generation, Derrida was thoroughly acquainted with the German phenomenological tradition (Hegel, Husserl, Heidegger) which had been the principal source of inspiration for existentialism. His first published work in 1962 was an important introduction to the translation of Edmund Husserl's Origin of Geometry. Voice and Phenomenon (La Voix et le phénomène), also on Husserl, followed in 1967. Derrida's reading of Husserl had little in common with orthodox existentialist interpretations, however, and was in certain respects closer to the preoccupations of structuralism. Two ground-breaking works were also published in 1967: Of Grammatology (De la grammatologie) and Writing and Difference (L'Écriture et la difference). Derrida's thinking in these texts crystallized around the concept of writing. His argument, best exemplified in the systematic and scholarly demonstration of De la grammatologie, was that throughout the history of Western thought writing had consistently been cast in a role subordinate to that of speech. Whereas speech was associated with reason and rationality (Greek: logos), the voice being closer to the inner 'truth' of individual consciousness, writing was viewed as an artificial extension or supplement to the voice, an auxiliary technology employed by human reason but not essential to it. Derrida's critique of this repression of writing or 'logocentrism' takes the form of close readings of thinkers representing different 'moments' of the logocentric tradition: Plato, Leibniz, Rousseau, Saussure, Lévi-Strauss. In each case he shows how arguments predicated on the exclusion of writing are in fact essentially dependent upon it. In addition to this, he proposes a more fundamental form of 'writing' that is the precondition of both speech and writing and indeed all cultural and communication systems.

Derrida's choice of Saussure, and especially of Lévi-Strauss, as examples of logocentric philosophy clearly had a polemical side, given the intellectual predominance of structuralism in France at the time. While Derrida recognized the important theoretical contribution of structuralism, he was critical of its reductionism. More generally, he questioned the claims of structuralism and the human sciences to have transcended the problems of traditional philosophy, arguing that the very discourse of the human sciences was dependent on unexamined presuppositions inherited from that tradition. Derrida's critique of the human sciences provided philosophy with a powerful alternative to the humanist-existentialist critique, whose success in checking the advance of structuralism had

-152-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Contemporary French Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface x
  • Introduction xi
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Classified Contents List xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 3
  • Further Reading 13
  • Further Reading 18
  • Further Reading 26
  • Further Reading 27
  • Further Reading 30
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 66
  • Further Reading 70
  • Major Works 79
  • C 85
  • Further Reading 91
  • Further Reading 99
  • Further Reading 111
  • Further Reading 113
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 144
  • Further Reading 150
  • Major Works 152
  • E 168
  • Further Reading 194
  • F 197
  • Further Reading 200
  • Further Reading 207
  • Major Works 214
  • Further Reading 245
  • G 252
  • Further Reading 279
  • Further Reading 280
  • H 283
  • I 290
  • Further Reading 297
  • J 302
  • Further Reading 303
  • Major Works 307
  • K 310
  • Further Reading 317
  • L 318
  • Major Works 324
  • Major Works 325
  • M 350
  • Further Reading 352
  • Further Reading 354
  • Major Works 364
  • Further Reading 379
  • Further Reading 380
  • N 388
  • Further Reading 397
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Further Reading 419
  • Major Works 424
  • Q 449
  • R 450
  • Further Reading 462
  • Further Reading 469
  • Major Works 470
  • Major Works 472
  • Further Reading 474
  • S 478
  • Further Reading 484
  • Further Reading 508
  • T 515
  • U 540
  • V 544
  • Further Reading 549
  • Further Reading 554
  • W 555
  • Further Reading 560
  • X 568
  • Y 569
  • Index 572
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 619

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.