Understanding Lifestyle Sport: Consumption, Identity, and Difference

By Belinda Wheaton | Go to book overview

9

'Anyone can play this game'

Ultimate frisbee, identity and difference

Andrew Thornton


Introduction

Anyone can play this game.

(Will/Interview)

It is a common claim made by 'Ultimate frisbee' players that 'anyone' could play their game. In this chapter I explore Ultimate players' struggles over their (athletic) embodiment and identity. My research shows that although Ultimate players reject and limit identifications with dominant sporting ideals they also continue to embrace some of their qualities. This process of identification suggests that maybe not 'everyone' will be able to become part of the Ultimate community.

Before examining the identity construction process, I give some background about Ultimate frisbee, the basis structure of play. I will then show that Ultimate players are concerned with presenting a new and 'different' sporting and cultural identity: one that is gender sensitive even egalitarian, rejects extreme competitiveness and physical aggression, and is all-inclusive. Yet, despite their claims, and ideals, Ultimate largely fails to produce practices and meanings that are beyond the dominant structures, ideals and practices of existing sports.


Historical development of Ultimate frisbee

'Ultimate frisbee' 1 is a sport that was invented late in the 1960s by a group of white, middle-class American High School males in the suburb of Maplewood, New Jersey. 2 They named themselves the 'Columbia High School Varsity Frisbee Squad' even though they, 'had not played any games, had no formal team or rules and someone's mother had made their team jerseys' (Zagoria 1998). Ultimate 2 was originally one part of a larger frisbee culture (Johnson 1975), but it is now the leading form of 'disc sport', except for perhaps disc golf. 3 The sport of Ultimate and culture originates in 1967-68 at a time of social turmoil in the United States. It was the time of the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights Movement and broader transformations in world politics, such as the heightening of the Cold War with the Soviet Union. It was a time of 'high anxiety' for American

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Lifestyle Sport: Consumption, Identity, and Difference
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editors' Foreword x
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - 'Chicks Dig Scars' 31
  • 3 - Death, Danger and the Selling of Risk in Adventure Sports 55
  • 4 - Sustainable Adventure 70
  • 5 - Surfing 94
  • 6 - Taking Risks 113
  • 7 - 'New Lads'? 131
  • 8 - 'Mandatory Equipment' 154
  • 9 - 'Anyone Can Play This Game' 175
  • 10 - Extreme America 197
  • Index 215
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.