Japanese Governance: Beyond Japan Inc.

By Jennifer Amyx; Peter Drysdale | Go to book overview

7

Reform and continuity in Japan's shingikai deliberation councils

Gregory W. Noble

By the end of the 1990s, the movement to increase transparency in government and reduce bureaucratic influence over policymaking appeared to gather considerable momentum in Japan. The Diet passed laws on administrative procedures and information openness while a Cabinet resolution gave a mandate to the establishment of a public comment system throughout the Japanese administrative system. In 1999, the Diet passed a series of bills, implemented in 2001, to reorganise the central ministries and strengthen control over policymaking by the Diet and Cabinet.

Amidst all the changes, reform efforts also took aim at the organisation and operation of Japan's elaborate system of shingikai or deliberation councils. Deliberative bodies designed to provide private-sector input to official decisionmaking are hardly unique to Japan, but in few, if any, countries are they as ubiquitous, stable and closely tied to the central departments of government (Schwartz 1998 and (Ehud Harari 1999). An official survey in 1998 counted more than 450 shingikai and the related but less formal kondankai or discussion councils (Administrative Management Bureau 1998). Major shingikai explore policies for industrial structure, financial and tax systems, social security and local government, and other central concerns of government. Narrower panels consider such issues as motor racing, livestock promotion and female juvenile delinquents (Management and Coordination Agency 1998). A few broad councils, including several working on administrative reform, report directly to the Prime Minister or Cabinet, but most are attached to specific ministries or agencies, which provide administrative support.

The push to reform shingikai is surprising, even ironic. Many observers, particularly abroad, have expressed deep admiration for the networks of communication between government and business in Japan epitomised by the shingikai. Hilton Root, for example, writes that 'deliberative councils…can provide a framework for the cooperation of economic actors by limiting the government's ability to change policy arbitrarily and, hence, redistribute

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Japanese Governance: Beyond Japan Inc.
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.