Constructing the Canon of Children's Literature: Beyond Library Walls and Ivory Towers

By Anne Lundin | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1.

Best Books: The Librarian

1.
Frances Clarke Sayers, Anne Carroll Moore: A Biography (New York: Athenaeum, 1972), 47.
2.
Frances Jenkins Olcott, The Children's Reading (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1927), 1.
3.
Anne Scott MacLeod, "Literary and Social Aspects of the Twenties and Thirties," in Stepping Away from Tradition: Children's Books of the Twenties and Thirties, ed. Sybille A. Jagusch (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1988), 52.
4.
Judith Plotz, "The Perpetual Messiah: Romanticism, Childhood, and the Paradoxes of Human Development," in Regulated Children/Liberated Children: Education in Psychological Perspective, ed. Barbara Finkelstein (New York: Psychohistory, 1979), 72.
5.
James Holt McGavran, "Introduction," Romanticism and Children's Literature in Nineteenth-Century England, ed. James Holt McGavran (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1991), 7.
6.
F. J. Harvey Darton, Children's Books in England: Five Centuries of Social Life, 3rd ed., ed. Brian Alderson (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1982), 1.
7.
Anne K. Mellor, Romanticism & Gender (New York: Routledge, 1993), 209.
8.
Mitzi Myers, "Reading Children and Homeopathic Romanticism: Paradigm Lost, Revisionary Gleam, or 'Plus Ça Change, Plus C'est La Même Chose,'" in Literature and the Child: Romantic Continuations and Postmodern Contestations, ed. James Holt McGavran, Jr. (Athens: University of Georgia Press), 45.
9.
Anne Carroll Moore, Roads to Childhood (New York: Doran, 1920), 135.
10.
Moore, My Roads to Childhood (Boston: Horn Book, 1964), 297.
11.
Mark Girouard, Sweetness and Light: The Queen Anne Movement 1860-1900 (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1984), 4.
12.
Jackson Lears, No Place of Grace: Antimodernism and the Transformation of American Culture, 1880-1920 (New York: Pantheon, 1981), 145.
13.
Barbara Garlitz, "The Immortality Ode: Its Cultural Progeny," Studies in English Literature VI (1966): 647.
14.
F. J. Harvey Darton, Children's Books in England: Five Centuries of Social Life, 3rd ed. Brian Alderson (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 1982), 179.
15.
Darton, 178.
16.
Mary Thwaite, From Primer to Pleasure in Reading (Boston: Horn Book, 1972), 81.
17.
Mildred Batchelder, "The Leadership Network in Children's Librarianship: A Remembrance," Stepping Away from Tradition: Children's Books of the Twenties and

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Constructing the Canon of Children's Literature: Beyond Library Walls and Ivory Towers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Editor's Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Prologue xiii
  • Chapter One - Best Books: the Librarian 1
  • Chapter Two - Best Books: the Scholar 57
  • Chapter Three - Best Books: the Reader 109
  • Epilogue 141
  • Notes 149
  • Selected Bibliography 161
  • Index 167
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.