Atlas of the English Civil War

By P. R. Newman | Go to book overview

subordinates in the thick of the fight did, and how successful they were. Lacking all the technical equipment which modern armies possess to inform themselves of the progress of events (although no guarantee against errors of judgement in themselves) civil war commanders threw their forces into the hands of fate every time they resolved upon battle, and no single civil war engagement can be singled out as a foregone conclusion, unless it be a minor ambush or a well co-ordinated surprise raid on sleeping enemy troops.


The Structure of the Atlas

In the following maps and accompanying commentaries, the reader is taken through the civil wars chronologically. A few maps show the state of the country overall at certain periods. Most maps look at particular regions where fighting was widespread, outlining the key stages of the fighting in those regions. These maps show the development of campaigns, the sites of battles, sieges and skirmishes. Some maps consider particularly important battles. For each battle there are generally two maps, one showing the locality and the precise site of the battle in relation to surrounding villages, the second showing the field itself in more detail and illustrating the action and the movements of the armies. Maps covering events in Scotland and Ireland are included also.

For each map there is a page of commentary which provides relevant background and an outline of the events portrayed on the map. The standard symbol for a battle site has been used and dates on the maps indicate the date of a battle, the fall of a town, the entry of an army into a particular town, as appropriate. Counties referred to are, of course, the pre-1974 counties.

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