Notes

ONE THE PERVASIVENESS OF PERSONALITY

1
From Christopher Hibbert, Nelson: A Personal History, London: Penguin Books, 1994, pp. 101-2.
2
Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.
3
In his Aspects of the Novel, London: Pelican Books, 1962.
4
Any good introductory book on social psychology will have a discussion of these and many other theories of personality; I have benefited from Robert Liebert and Michael Spiegler, Personality: Strategies and Issues, Pacific Grove, Calif.: Brooks/Cole Publishing, in many editions.
5
For a thorough discussion of these issues, see Rosalind Hursthouse's excellent On Virtue Ethics, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999, and Bernard Williams' 'Acting as the virtuous person acts', in Robert Heinaman, ed., Aristotle and Moral Realism, London: UCL Press, 1995, pp. 13-23.
6
Hitler, vol. 1: 1889-1936: Hubris, London: Penguin Books, 2001, p. 271.
7
Marcel Proust, A la Recherche du temps perdu, translated as In Search of Lost Time, C. K. Scott Moncrieff and T. Kilmartin, rev. D. J. Enright, London: Vintage Books, 1996, vol. 2, p. 565.
8
Human All Too Human, trans. R. J. Hollingdale, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986, Section 51. Incidentally, my example also reveals that having some personality traits depends on or requires having certain other things: to be a toff, it's necessary to have a certain amount of money and leisure time.
9
As evidenced by a recent poll in the United States: 84 per cent of adults interviewed believe that God performs miracles, and 48 per cent believe that they themselves have witnessed a miracle (Newsweek Poll conducted

On Personality

-129-

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On Personality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • One - The Pervasiveness of Personality 1
  • Two - Good and Bad People: a Question of Character 27
  • Three - The Fragility of Character 52
  • Four - Character, Responsibility and Circumspection 78
  • Five - Personality, Narrative and Living a Life 104
  • Notes 129
  • Index 139
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